Winter weather used to stop deer from living further north, but thanks to climate change, that’s no longer true. Now as warm weather makes more frequent appearances, so do the deer, greatly impacting local vegetation and wildlife. Since the early 20th century, white-tailed deer have spread further than ever at the southern edge of the boreal forest. According to researchers Dawe and Boutin, there was a 17.5-fold increase in white-tailed deer population between the 1990’s and 2000’s in northeastern Alberta 🇨🇦 Now, the deer have even reached 64° latitude, making them officially classified as a boreal species. A recent study published in “Wildlife Research” shows that climate change is one of the factors causing deer to migrate further north and it’s creating a ripple effect in the ecosystem. This study confirms previous research published in 2016 stating that the white-tailed deer distribution depends on temperature and snow depth. This influx of deer into the food chain caused an increase of wolves in the area. Dan Stark, a DNR large carnivore specialist, explains, “When we have more deer, we have more wolves, and we’ll coexist with that.” But more wolves means increased danger for the native caribou population. As the temperature is expecting to rise, management and adaptation plans are necessary to anticipate further changes and protect native species. Do you see more 🦌 than before? Let us know in the comments below ⇣ ▪︎ ▪︎ ▪︎ ▪︎ ▪︎ #YEARSproject #deer #Canada #north #boreal #temperature #whitetailedeer #wildlife #caribou #winter #snow #study #herbivatory #elk #moose #managementplan #wolves - The Years Project

Winter weather used to stop deer from living further north, but thanks to climate change, that’s no longer true. Now as warm weather makes more frequent appearances, so do the deer, greatly impacting local vegetation and wildlife. Since the early 20th century, white-tailed deer have spread further than ever at the southern edge of the boreal forest. According to researchers Dawe and Boutin, there was a 17.5-fold increase in white-tailed deer population between the 1990’s and 2000’s in northeastern Alberta 🇨🇦 Now, the deer have even reached 64° latitude, making them officially classified as a boreal species. A recent study published in “Wildlife Research” shows that climate change is one of the factors causing deer to migrate further north and it’s creating a ripple effect in the ecosystem. This study confirms previous research published in 2016 stating that the white-tailed deer distribution depends on temperature and snow depth. This influx of deer into the food chain caused an increase of wolves in the area. Dan Stark, a DNR large carnivore specialist, explains, “When we have more deer, we have more wolves, and we’ll coexist with that.” But more wolves means increased danger for the native caribou population. As the temperature is expecting to rise, management and adaptation plans are necessary to anticipate further changes and protect native species. Do you see more 🦌 than before? Let us know in the comments below ⇣ ▪︎ ▪︎ ▪︎ ▪︎ ▪︎ #YEARSproject #deer #Canada #north #boreal #temperature #whitetailedeer #wildlife #caribou #winter #snow #study #herbivatory #elk #moose #managementplan #wolves