Climate change poses a direct threat to game hunting in America. For many in rural America, hunting is a way to bond with family and often a historic tradition. It’s also a practical way to control the overpopulation of white-tailed deer–U.S. population is at an estimated 30-35 million. The decline of game animals would also result in the loss of billions of dollars and jobs related to hunting. Nationally, Americans spend upwards of 23 billion dollars on hunting-related purchases and provide the country with 3.5 billion dollars in state, local and federal tax. Game hunting helps fund conservation efforts by allowing government agencies to buy up land and maintain it for future hunters. It also provides research on wildlife and wildlife management programs. As more deer are migrating up north due to climate change, other popular game species like brook trout, moose, sage grouse, pintail and many more are at risk due to extreme weather and ecosystem changes. Droughts, floods, fires and warming winters all affect these animals, exacerbate population decline and contribute to the loss of habitat. The mule deer, for example, has experienced population decline and habitat loss due to droughts and oil and gas developments. The snowshoe hare has been unable to effectively molt with earlier winters, making it an easy target for predators. As a response, the Pennsylvania game commission reduced hare hunting to less than a week in some areas. Moose populations have also been on the decline because warming weather makes them more susceptible to diseases and parasites. If you're an avid hunter or angler and care about conserving our wildlife check out the link in our bio and click “What We’re Reading” to see how you can make a difference. How do you feel about climate change’s impact on this American tradition? ▪︎ ▪︎ ▪︎ ▪︎ ▪︎ #YEARSproject #deer #trout #jobs #muledeer #climatechange #wildlife #hunting #tradition - The Years Project

Climate change poses a direct threat to game hunting in America. For many in rural America, hunting is a way to bond with family and often a historic tradition. It’s also a practical way to control the overpopulation of white-tailed deer–U.S. population is at an estimated 30-35 million. The decline of game animals would also result in the loss of billions of dollars and jobs related to hunting. Nationally, Americans spend upwards of 23 billion dollars on hunting-related purchases and provide the country with 3.5 billion dollars in state, local and federal tax. Game hunting helps fund conservation efforts by allowing government agencies to buy up land and maintain it for future hunters. It also provides research on wildlife and wildlife management programs. As more deer are migrating up north due to climate change, other popular game species like brook trout, moose, sage grouse, pintail and many more are at risk due to extreme weather and ecosystem changes. Droughts, floods, fires and warming winters all affect these animals, exacerbate population decline and contribute to the loss of habitat. The mule deer, for example, has experienced population decline and habitat loss due to droughts and oil and gas developments. The snowshoe hare has been unable to effectively molt with earlier winters, making it an easy target for predators. As a response, the Pennsylvania game commission reduced hare hunting to less than a week in some areas. Moose populations have also been on the decline because warming weather makes them more susceptible to diseases and parasites. If you’re an avid hunter or angler and care about conserving our wildlife check out the link in our bio and click “What We’re Reading” to see how you can make a difference. How do you feel about climate change’s impact on this American tradition? ▪︎ ▪︎ ▪︎ ▪︎ ▪︎ #YEARSproject #deer #trout #jobs #muledeer #climatechange #wildlife #hunting #tradition