This desert used to be full of birds, but climate change has wiped many of them out. Located in California and Nevada, the Mojave Desert has lost nearly half of its bird species in the last century. A new study conducted by researchers at Stanford and UC Berkeley reveals that climate change is to blame. The scientists found the strongest correlation between declining bird communities and decreased precipitation combined with rising temperatures. That’s right, there is such a thing as a desert that’s too dry and hot. The researchers also found that this population decline happened despite the fact that most of this desert is protected as national parks or preserves, providing further evidence that the warming climate is causing birds to die. Regarding these observations, one researcher noted, “Studies elsewhere have found that climate change typically makes places unfavorable for some birds but opens the door for others to come in...in the desert we are not seeing increases in any of our species except for the common raven. There are a lack of climate change winners in the system." Are you worried about our flying friends? Click the link in our bio to read the study. - Years Of Living Dangerously

This desert used to be full of birds, but climate change has wiped many of them out. Located in California and Nevada, the Mojave Desert has lost nearly half of its bird species in the last century. A new study conducted by researchers at Stanford and UC Berkeley reveals that climate change is to blame. The scientists found the strongest correlation between declining bird communities and decreased precipitation combined with rising temperatures. That’s right, there is such a thing as a desert that’s too dry and hot. The researchers also found that this population decline happened despite the fact that most of this desert is protected as national parks or preserves, providing further evidence that the warming climate is causing birds to die. Regarding these observations, one researcher noted, “Studies elsewhere have found that climate change typically makes places unfavorable for some birds but opens the door for others to come in…in the desert we are not seeing increases in any of our species except for the common raven. There are a lack of climate change winners in the system.” Are you worried about our flying friends? Click the link in our bio to read the study.