The Moai, the iconic carved statues of Easter Island (also referred to as Rapa Nui by its Indigenous population), could disappear because of climate change. The island and these important artifacts are at risk from sea level rise and increasingly stronger storms. Waves are already starting to reach these famous landmarks built about a thousand years ago. According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) @ipcc, sea levels will rise 5 to 6 feet by 2100. But the rising sea level is not the only concern of the Rapa Nui population. The economy of the island relies heavily on tourism. In 2017, about 100,000 tourists came to Easter Island to see the Moai, compared to the 6,000 inhabitants. The disappearance of these landmarks will cause both economic and cultural damages. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The ocean is an important source of food for the Rapa Nui people. 77% of the Pacific Ocean’s fish abundance swims around Easter Island. The industrial and extractive industries threaten these 🐠 and impoverish the resources for the inhabitants. The local inhabitants are also concerned about a decrease in local marine life and potential food scarcity. In 2015, a local fishermen association, Hanga Riko, raised its voice to request a conservation area around the island to protect sea life. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ In September 2017, in a referendum, 73% of the voters finally agreed to the creation of a protection area where only artisanal fishing is allowed. The Chilean government officially approved what is now one of the largest marine reserves of the world in February 2018. This Rapa Nui Marine Protected Area encompasses 286,000 square miles of Pacific Ocean, roughly the size of the entire country. Some scientists even believe that marine reserves like this may mitigate the effects of climate change for the future 🗿🏝🌊🐠 - Years Of Living Dangerously

The Moai, the iconic carved statues of Easter Island (also referred to as Rapa Nui by its Indigenous population), could disappear because of climate change. The island and these important artifacts are at risk from sea level rise and increasingly stronger storms. Waves are already starting to reach these famous landmarks built about a thousand years ago. According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) @ipcc, sea levels will rise 5 to 6 feet by 2100. But the rising sea level is not the only concern of the Rapa Nui population. The economy of the island relies heavily on tourism. In 2017, about 100,000 tourists came to Easter Island to see the Moai, compared to the 6,000 inhabitants. The disappearance of these landmarks will cause both economic and cultural damages. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The ocean is an important source of food for the Rapa Nui people. 77% of the Pacific Ocean’s fish abundance swims around Easter Island. The industrial and extractive industries threaten these 🐠 and impoverish the resources for the inhabitants. The local inhabitants are also concerned about a decrease in local marine life and potential food scarcity. In 2015, a local fishermen association, Hanga Riko, raised its voice to request a conservation area around the island to protect sea life. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ In September 2017, in a referendum, 73% of the voters finally agreed to the creation of a protection area where only artisanal fishing is allowed. The Chilean government officially approved what is now one of the largest marine reserves of the world in February 2018. This Rapa Nui Marine Protected Area encompasses 286,000 square miles of Pacific Ocean, roughly the size of the entire country. Some scientists even believe that marine reserves like this may mitigate the effects of climate change for the future 🗿🏝🌊🐠