Some of the world’s oldest and biggest trees are dying off, and climate change might be the culprit. The baobab tree, often called “the tree of life,” can live up to 3,000 years old and is found in Africa’s savanna. A study published in the journal Nature Plants found that nine of the oldest 🌳 and five of the biggest 🌳 have completely or partially died in the past twelve years. The scientists investigating this suspect that climate change is to blame due to the changing conditions affecting the Southern Africa region. To read more about the study, click the link in our bio 📲 - Years Of Living Dangerously

Some of the world’s oldest and biggest trees are dying off, and climate change might be the culprit. The baobab tree, often called “the tree of life,” can live up to 3,000 years old and is found in Africa’s savanna. A study published in the journal Nature Plants found that nine of the oldest 🌳 and five of the biggest 🌳 have completely or partially died in the past twelve years. The scientists investigating this suspect that climate change is to blame due to the changing conditions affecting the Southern Africa region. To read more about the study, click the link in our bio 📲

Some of the world’s oldest and biggest trees are dying off, and climate change might be the culprit. The baobab tree, often called “the tree of life,” can live up to 3,000 years old and is found in Africa’s savanna.
A study published in the journal Nature Plants found that nine of the oldest 🌳 and five of the biggest 🌳 have completely or partially died in the past twelve years. The scientists investigating this suspect that climate change is to blame due to the changing conditions affecting the Southern Africa region. To read more about the study, click the link in our bio 📲

Some of the world’s oldest and biggest trees are dying off, and climate change might be the culprit. The baobab tree, often called “the tree of life,” can live up to 3,000 years old and is found in Africa’s savanna. 
A study published in the journal Nature Plants found that nine of the oldest 🌳 and five of the biggest 🌳 have completely or partially died in the past twelve years. The scientists investigating this suspect that climate change is to blame due to the changing conditions affecting the Southern Africa region. To read more about the study, click the link in our bio 📲

Photo taken at: Kruger National Park

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