Many of the objects we use in our daily lives made their way to us by sea and their journey has contributed to the exacerbation of climate change. According to the UN, more than 90% of trade in the world is carried across the ocean. Cargo ships often run on bunker fuel, an inexpensive and abundant resource that’s also an extremely toxic and sulfur rich byproduct of the petroleum refining process. Though it contributes about 3% of global emissions, the shipping industry remains outside of any international agreement to limit emissions. That’s the equivalent of 1 billion tons of CO2 being released into the atmosphere unchecked. But what are the options for managing emissions caused by trade from so many different nations and organizations? Maurice Meehan, the late director of global shipping operations with Carbon War Room, suggested that “setting speed limits could make a big impact,” potentially reducing emissions by 12% by 2030. Additionally, this number could increase to a 20-30% reduction if modern carbon-efficient tech on the ships were retrofitted. - Years Of Living Dangerously

Many of the objects we use in our daily lives made their way to us by sea and their journey has contributed to the exacerbation of climate change. According to the UN, more than 90% of trade in the world is carried across the ocean. Cargo ships often run on bunker fuel, an inexpensive and abundant resource that’s also an extremely toxic and sulfur rich byproduct of the petroleum refining process. Though it contributes about 3% of global emissions, the shipping industry remains outside of any international agreement to limit emissions. That’s the equivalent of 1 billion tons of CO2 being released into the atmosphere unchecked. But what are the options for managing emissions caused by trade from so many different nations and organizations? Maurice Meehan, the late director of global shipping operations with Carbon War Room, suggested that “setting speed limits could make a big impact,” potentially reducing emissions by 12% by 2030. Additionally, this number could increase to a 20-30% reduction if modern carbon-efficient tech on the ships were retrofitted.

Many of the objects we use in our daily lives made their way to us by sea and their journey has contributed to the exacerbation of climate change. According to the UN, more than 90% of trade in the world is carried across the ocean. Cargo ships often run on bunker fuel, an inexpensive and abundant resource that’s also an extremely toxic and sulfur rich byproduct of the petroleum refining process. Though it contributes about 3% of global emissions, the shipping industry remains outside of any international agreement to limit emissions. That’s the equivalent of 1 billion tons of CO2 being released into the atmosphere unchecked. But what are the options for managing emissions caused by trade from so many different nations and organizations? Maurice Meehan, the late director of global shipping operations with Carbon War Room, suggested that “setting speed limits could make a big impact,” potentially reducing emissions by 12% by 2030. Additionally, this number could increase to a 20-30% reduction if modern carbon-efficient tech on the ships were retrofitted.

Many of the objects we use in our daily lives made their way to us by sea and their journey has contributed to the exacerbation of climate change. According to the UN, more than 90% of trade in the world is carried across the ocean. Cargo ships often run on bunker fuel, an inexpensive and abundant resource that’s also an extremely toxic and sulfur rich byproduct of the petroleum refining process. Though it contributes about 3% of global emissions, the shipping industry remains outside of any international agreement to limit emissions. That’s the equivalent of 1 billion tons of CO2 being released into the atmosphere unchecked. But what are the options for managing emissions caused by trade from so many different nations and organizations? Maurice Meehan, the late director of global shipping operations with Carbon War Room, suggested that “setting speed limits could make a big impact,” potentially reducing emissions by 12% by 2030. Additionally, this number could increase to a 20-30% reduction if modern carbon-efficient tech on the ships were retrofitted.

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