It’s often thought that alien life would be more intelligent than humans, but could even the most intelligent civilization survive climate change? A new simulation conducted by astrophysicist Adam Frank challenges this thought. Using the fall of civilization on Easter Island as a model, Frank’s team examined how extraterrestrial life might react to climate change. Four separate simulations were conducted, examining the results with different degrees of action. While the first three scenarios resulted in the downfall of the civilization due to little or no sustainable actions, the last simulation had positive results. In this model, the hypothetical civilization adopted solar energy quickly and efficiently. The population levels off after enforcing sustainable practices, successfully managing to save their inhabitants from the rising temperatures and depleting resources. Adam Frank suggests that by looking at climate change in a “cosmic context,” we can better understand how it will potentially affect our own planet in the years to come. To read more about this study, click the link in our bio. - Years Of Living Dangerously

It’s often thought that alien life would be more intelligent than humans, but could even the most intelligent civilization survive climate change? A new simulation conducted by astrophysicist Adam Frank challenges this thought. Using the fall of civilization on Easter Island as a model, Frank’s team examined how extraterrestrial life might react to climate change. Four separate simulations were conducted, examining the results with different degrees of action. While the first three scenarios resulted in the downfall of the civilization due to little or no sustainable actions, the last simulation had positive results. In this model, the hypothetical civilization adopted solar energy quickly and efficiently. The population levels off after enforcing sustainable practices, successfully managing to save their inhabitants from the rising temperatures and depleting resources. Adam Frank suggests that by looking at climate change in a “cosmic context,” we can better understand how it will potentially affect our own planet in the years to come. To read more about this study, click the link in our bio.