Farmers in Ethiopia are facing the brunt of climate change in their coffee fields. Climate change has caused a temperature increase of 2.3 ℉ in many coffee growing regions such as Ethiopia. These same regions have also faced a decrease in rainfall resulting in the loss of thousands of hectares of coffee plants, the spread of plant killing diseases, and delayed harvesting periods. But less crops means farmers now risk losing contracts with their international buyers. In order to mitigate the effects of climate change, farmers have started moving their coffee fields to higher elevations. Although there is little evidence to prove that this is a long-term solution, it is the best option for small scale farmers given their limited resources. According to Tadesse Woldemariam, the Senior Technical Advisor at Ethiopia's Environmental Change & Coffee Forest Forum, “60% of Ethiopia’s traditional coffee producing regions might lose the crop if climate change remains unchecked.” The most likely outcome will be a loss of quality in coffee and an increase in price. Where do you source the beans for your daily ☕️? - Years Of Living Dangerously

Farmers in Ethiopia are facing the brunt of climate change in their coffee fields. Climate change has caused a temperature increase of 2.3 ℉ in many coffee growing regions such as Ethiopia. These same regions have also faced a decrease in rainfall resulting in the loss of thousands of hectares of coffee plants, the spread of plant killing diseases, and delayed harvesting periods. But less crops means farmers now risk losing contracts with their international buyers. In order to mitigate the effects of climate change, farmers have started moving their coffee fields to higher elevations. Although there is little evidence to prove that this is a long-term solution, it is the best option for small scale farmers given their limited resources. According to Tadesse Woldemariam, the Senior Technical Advisor at Ethiopia’s Environmental Change & Coffee Forest Forum, “60% of Ethiopia’s traditional coffee producing regions might lose the crop if climate change remains unchecked.” The most likely outcome will be a loss of quality in coffee and an increase in price. Where do you source the beans for your daily ☕️?

Farmers in Ethiopia are facing the brunt of climate change in their coffee fields. Climate change has caused a temperature increase of 2.3 ℉ in many coffee growing regions such as Ethiopia. These same regions have also faced a decrease in rainfall resulting in the loss of thousands of hectares of coffee plants, the spread of plant killing diseases, and delayed harvesting periods. But less crops means farmers now risk losing contracts with their international buyers. In order to mitigate the effects of climate change, farmers have started moving their coffee fields to higher elevations. Although there is little evidence to prove that this is a long-term solution, it is the best option for small scale farmers given their limited resources. According to Tadesse Woldemariam, the Senior Technical Advisor at Ethiopia’s Environmental Change & Coffee Forest Forum, “60% of Ethiopia’s traditional coffee producing regions might lose the crop if climate change remains unchecked.” The most likely outcome will be a loss of quality in coffee and an increase in price. Where do you source the beans for your daily ☕️?

Farmers in Ethiopia are facing the brunt of climate change in their coffee fields. Climate change has caused a temperature increase of 2.3 ℉  in many coffee growing regions such as Ethiopia. These same regions have also faced a decrease in rainfall resulting in the loss of thousands of hectares of coffee plants, the spread of plant killing diseases, and delayed harvesting periods. But less crops means farmers now risk losing contracts with their international buyers. In order to mitigate the effects of climate change, farmers have started moving their coffee fields to higher elevations. Although there is little evidence to prove that this is a long-term solution, it is the best option for small scale farmers given their limited resources. According to Tadesse Woldemariam, the Senior Technical Advisor at Ethiopia’s Environmental Change & Coffee Forest Forum, “60% of Ethiopia’s traditional coffee producing regions might lose the crop if climate change remains unchecked.” The most likely outcome will be a loss of quality in coffee and an increase in price. Where do you source the beans for your daily ☕️?

Photo taken at: Ethiopia

View in Instagram ⇒