Did you know that whales can be an important ally in fighting climate change? While diving, the massive body of a whale helps push nutrients from the ocean’s floor to the its surface, in turn feeding phytoplankton and other marine flora. This is important because these tiny creatures absorb carbon. Scientists speculate the carbon sequestered by 80 whales could equate to that sequestered by 208 acres of U.S. forest. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀ There’s another less graceful way whales help the ocean absorb carbon–pooping 💩🐋 The nutrients they release during defecation helps create marine plants, which are also important consumers of CO2. But as oceans warm due to climate change, whale migration patterns could become less predictable, leaving the extent to which they can impact the ocean’s CO2 levels in the future unknown. - Years Of Living Dangerously

Did you know that whales can be an important ally in fighting climate change? While diving, the massive body of a whale helps push nutrients from the ocean’s floor to the its surface, in turn feeding phytoplankton and other marine flora. This is important because these tiny creatures absorb carbon. Scientists speculate the carbon sequestered by 80 whales could equate to that sequestered by 208 acres of U.S. forest. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀ There’s another less graceful way whales help the ocean absorb carbon–pooping 💩🐋 The nutrients they release during defecation helps create marine plants, which are also important consumers of CO2. But as oceans warm due to climate change, whale migration patterns could become less predictable, leaving the extent to which they can impact the ocean’s CO2 levels in the future unknown.

Did you know that whales can be an important ally in fighting climate change? While diving, the massive body of a whale helps push nutrients from the ocean’s floor to the its surface, in turn feeding phytoplankton and other marine flora. This is important because these tiny creatures absorb carbon. Scientists speculate the carbon sequestered by 80 whales could equate to that sequestered by 208 acres of U.S. forest.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀
There’s another less graceful way whales help the ocean absorb carbon–pooping 💩🐋 The nutrients they release during defecation helps create marine plants, which are also important consumers of CO2. But as oceans warm due to climate change, whale migration patterns could become less predictable, leaving the extent to which they can impact the ocean’s CO2 levels in the future unknown.

Did you know that whales can be an important ally in fighting climate change? While diving, the massive body of a whale helps push nutrients from the ocean’s floor to the its surface, in turn feeding phytoplankton and other marine flora. This is important because these tiny creatures absorb carbon. Scientists speculate the carbon sequestered by 80 whales could equate to that sequestered by 208 acres of U.S. forest.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀
There’s another less graceful way whales help the ocean absorb carbon–pooping 💩🐋 The nutrients they release during defecation helps create marine plants, which are also important consumers of CO2. But as oceans warm due to climate change, whale migration patterns could become less predictable, leaving the extent to which they can impact the ocean’s CO2 levels in the future unknown.

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