Did you know that New Zealand has the greatest diversity of seabirds in the world? Of the 360 seabird species around the globe, 86 breed in New Zealand, 37 of which are exclusive to the country. But 90% of New Zealand’s seabirds are threatened with extinction. Pollution, climate change, and exploitation of marine resources are endangering our flying friends. Eight million tons of plastic pollute the environment each year, which is the greatest threat to New Zealand’s seabirds. Seabirds are particularly vulnerable to damage from plastics because most of them feed on the ocean’s surface. A 2015 study suggests that 99% of seabirds will be ingesting plastic by 2050. They search for food along eddies and oceanic convergence zones–the same areas where plastic accumulates. When a seabird (or any animal) ingests plastic, its toxic chemicals can leach into the animal’s tissue, preventing growth, reducing ability to reproduce, and even killing the bird and other marine animals. Are you concerned about oceans and seabirds? Comment if you think it’s time to create an international agreement on plastic pollution 🐦 🌊 - Years Of Living Dangerously

Did you know that New Zealand has the greatest diversity of seabirds in the world? Of the 360 seabird species around the globe, 86 breed in New Zealand, 37 of which are exclusive to the country. But 90% of New Zealand’s seabirds are threatened with extinction. Pollution, climate change, and exploitation of marine resources are endangering our flying friends. Eight million tons of plastic pollute the environment each year, which is the greatest threat to New Zealand’s seabirds. Seabirds are particularly vulnerable to damage from plastics because most of them feed on the ocean’s surface. A 2015 study suggests that 99% of seabirds will be ingesting plastic by 2050. They search for food along eddies and oceanic convergence zones–the same areas where plastic accumulates. When a seabird (or any animal) ingests plastic, its toxic chemicals can leach into the animal’s tissue, preventing growth, reducing ability to reproduce, and even killing the bird and other marine animals. Are you concerned about oceans and seabirds? Comment if you think it’s time to create an international agreement on plastic pollution 🐦 🌊

Did you know that New Zealand has the greatest diversity of seabirds in the world? Of the 360 seabird species around the globe, 86 breed in New Zealand, 37 of which are exclusive to the country. But 90% of New Zealand’s seabirds are threatened with extinction. Pollution, climate change, and exploitation of marine resources are endangering our flying friends. Eight million tons of plastic pollute the environment each year, which is the greatest threat to New Zealand’s seabirds. Seabirds are particularly vulnerable to damage from plastics because most of them feed on the ocean’s surface. A 2015 study suggests that 99% of seabirds will be ingesting plastic by 2050. They search for food along eddies and oceanic convergence zones–the same areas where plastic accumulates. When a seabird (or any animal) ingests plastic, its toxic chemicals can leach into the animal’s tissue, preventing growth, reducing ability to reproduce, and even killing the bird and other marine animals. Are you concerned about oceans and seabirds? Comment if you think it’s time to create an international agreement on plastic pollution 🐦 🌊

Did you know that New Zealand has the greatest diversity of seabirds in the world? Of the 360 seabird species around the globe, 86 breed in New Zealand, 37 of which are exclusive to the country. But 90% of New Zealand’s seabirds are threatened with extinction. Pollution, climate change, and exploitation of marine resources are endangering our flying friends. Eight million tons of plastic pollute the environment each year, which is the greatest threat to New Zealand’s seabirds. Seabirds are particularly vulnerable to damage from plastics because most of them feed on the ocean’s surface. A 2015 study suggests that 99% of seabirds will be ingesting plastic by 2050. They search for food along eddies and oceanic convergence zones–the same areas where plastic accumulates. When a seabird (or any animal) ingests plastic, its toxic chemicals can leach into the animal’s tissue, preventing growth, reducing ability to reproduce, and even killing the bird and other marine animals. Are you concerned about oceans and seabirds? Comment if you think it’s time to create an international agreement on plastic pollution 🐦 🌊

Photo taken at: New Zealand

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