Did you know that climate change also affects the eating habits of insects? A recent study led by the @uofwa’s climate scientists reveals that the hotter the weather is, the more populous and hungrier crop-eating bugs there are. About 10% of the globe’s food is now consumed by insects and this will increase to 15 to 20% by the end of the 21st century. Warmer weather speeds up these bug’s metabolism making them grow faster and if temperatures rise by 2.7 degrees, researchers estimate additional losses of 53 million tons in wheat, rice, and corn. While these invasive species are growing, the so-called “beneficial pollinators,” such as bees, are decreasing, leaving more space for other devastating insects. In Russia, the wheat aphid population is spreading so fast that the ecology professor at the @universityofvermont, Scott Merrill, asserts, “they are born pregnant!” Russia would see a sixfold decrease of rice crop due to bugs damages. Of course, richer countries may use insecticides (which are also controversial due to the potential harm to humans and the environment) to reduce bug population, but what about everyone else? Have you seen the effects of these critters in your crops? Let us know in the comments below 🌾🐛 - Years Of Living Dangerously

Did you know that climate change also affects the eating habits of insects? A recent study led by the @uofwa’s climate scientists reveals that the hotter the weather is, the more populous and hungrier crop-eating bugs there are. About 10% of the globe’s food is now consumed by insects and this will increase to 15 to 20% by the end of the 21st century. Warmer weather speeds up these bug’s metabolism making them grow faster and if temperatures rise by 2.7 degrees, researchers estimate additional losses of 53 million tons in wheat, rice, and corn. While these invasive species are growing, the so-called “beneficial pollinators,” such as bees, are decreasing, leaving more space for other devastating insects. In Russia, the wheat aphid population is spreading so fast that the ecology professor at the @universityofvermont, Scott Merrill, asserts, “they are born pregnant!” Russia would see a sixfold decrease of rice crop due to bugs damages. Of course, richer countries may use insecticides (which are also controversial due to the potential harm to humans and the environment) to reduce bug population, but what about everyone else? Have you seen the effects of these critters in your crops? Let us know in the comments below 🌾🐛