Coral reefs aren’t the only underwater structures being destroyed by climate change–precious shipwrecks and archeological sites are facing severe damage. Storm surges and violent weather patterns pose an immediate threat to underwater archeological sites. Hurricanes blowing over these sites and shipwrecks can splinter them into oblivion, or at least batter and damage the already fragile artifacts. Oceans are absorbing more carbon dioxide, becoming hotter and more acidic, which is a big problem when you’re trying to preserve something. These chemical changes are likely to erode cement-like coatings on historic wrecks. The hotter temperatures get and the more acidic oceans become, the faster things will deteriorate. The @smithsonian has referred to ocean acidification as “climate change’s equally evil twin.” This means that climate change not only poses a threat to our future, but also our history. - Years Of Living Dangerously

Coral reefs aren’t the only underwater structures being destroyed by climate change–precious shipwrecks and archeological sites are facing severe damage. Storm surges and violent weather patterns pose an immediate threat to underwater archeological sites. Hurricanes blowing over these sites and shipwrecks can splinter them into oblivion, or at least batter and damage the already fragile artifacts. Oceans are absorbing more carbon dioxide, becoming hotter and more acidic, which is a big problem when you’re trying to preserve something. These chemical changes are likely to erode cement-like coatings on historic wrecks. The hotter temperatures get and the more acidic oceans become, the faster things will deteriorate. The @smithsonian has referred to ocean acidification as “climate change’s equally evil twin.” This means that climate change not only poses a threat to our future, but also our history.

Coral reefs aren’t the only underwater structures being destroyed by climate change–precious shipwrecks and archeological sites are facing severe damage. Storm surges and violent weather patterns pose an immediate threat to underwater archeological sites. Hurricanes blowing over these sites and shipwrecks can splinter them into oblivion, or at least batter and damage the already fragile artifacts. Oceans are absorbing more carbon dioxide, becoming hotter and more acidic, which is a big problem when you’re trying to preserve something. These chemical changes are likely to erode cement-like coatings on historic wrecks. The hotter temperatures get and the more acidic oceans become, the faster things will deteriorate. The @smithsonian has referred to ocean acidification as “climate change’s equally evil twin.” This means that climate change not only poses a threat to our future, but also our history.

Coral reefs aren’t the only underwater structures being destroyed by climate change–precious shipwrecks and archeological sites are facing severe damage. Storm surges and violent weather patterns pose an immediate threat to underwater archeological sites. Hurricanes blowing over these sites and shipwrecks can splinter them into oblivion, or at least batter and damage the already fragile artifacts. Oceans are absorbing more carbon dioxide, becoming hotter and more acidic, which is a big problem when you’re trying to preserve something. These chemical changes are likely to erode cement-like coatings on historic wrecks. The hotter temperatures get and the more acidic oceans become, the faster things will deteriorate. The @smithsonian has referred to ocean acidification as “climate change’s equally evil twin.” This means that climate change not only poses a threat to our future, but also our history.

Photo taken at: RMS Titanic

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