Colombia's 2016 peace agreement with the FARC is creating new discussions about the future of its forests. Forests once occupied by the guerrilla group are now becoming more available to farmers and loggers. Following the end to a five decade long conflict, swathes of forest have become opened to industry. An article in the journal Nature states that “deforestation increased by 44% in the year of the peace accords.” However, since 2013, an environmental protection agency called @cornare has been using Colombia's carbon tax to pay 3,000 families to protect the ecosystems which are at risk for deforestation. They are hoping to expand the measure to even more families in the future. Also following the peace agreement, scientists have been able to come into the forests in renewed efforts to document the biodiversity of previously challenging regions. In ten days of searching one section of forest, biologists from @instituto_humboldt found six new species, which included frogs and beetles 🐸🐞 - Years Of Living Dangerously

Colombia’s 2016 peace agreement with the FARC is creating new discussions about the future of its forests. Forests once occupied by the guerrilla group are now becoming more available to farmers and loggers. Following the end to a five decade long conflict, swathes of forest have become opened to industry. An article in the journal Nature states that “deforestation increased by 44% in the year of the peace accords.” However, since 2013, an environmental protection agency called @cornare has been using Colombia’s carbon tax to pay 3,000 families to protect the ecosystems which are at risk for deforestation. They are hoping to expand the measure to even more families in the future. Also following the peace agreement, scientists have been able to come into the forests in renewed efforts to document the biodiversity of previously challenging regions. In ten days of searching one section of forest, biologists from @instituto_humboldt found six new species, which included frogs and beetles 🐸🐞