Climate change is affecting the way trees are growing. Due to a longer growing season, sometimes extended by 3 weeks per year, trees are able to grow faster. Beech and Spruce trees have seen an increase in growth rate by up to 77% since 1870. However, the higher temperatures which allow for the longer seasons, combined with pollution, are making wood weaker. This makes the trees vulnerable to breaking and the lumber less durable. Researchers at @tu.muenchen studied four types of trees and found that wood density has decreased by 8% since 1870 as well. Though 8% may seem like a small number, it has big impacts on our climate. Trees are one of our best resources in fighting the amount of carbon in the atmosphere. The researchers also found that as the density dropped, the tree’s carbon content did too by a whopping 50%, meaning less dense trees can absorb less carbon. One environmental scientist at @universityofhelsinki believes though, that with faster growing forests, the change in density of individual trees may become less important. Keeping our forests alive and well is a vital act in fighting climate change 🌲🌲🌲 - Years Of Living Dangerously

Climate change is affecting the way trees are growing. Due to a longer growing season, sometimes extended by 3 weeks per year, trees are able to grow faster. Beech and Spruce trees have seen an increase in growth rate by up to 77% since 1870. However, the higher temperatures which allow for the longer seasons, combined with pollution, are making wood weaker. This makes the trees vulnerable to breaking and the lumber less durable. Researchers at @tu.muenchen studied four types of trees and found that wood density has decreased by 8% since 1870 as well. Though 8% may seem like a small number, it has big impacts on our climate. Trees are one of our best resources in fighting the amount of carbon in the atmosphere. The researchers also found that as the density dropped, the tree’s carbon content did too by a whopping 50%, meaning less dense trees can absorb less carbon. One environmental scientist at @universityofhelsinki believes though, that with faster growing forests, the change in density of individual trees may become less important. Keeping our forests alive and well is a vital act in fighting climate change 🌲🌲🌲

Climate change is affecting the way trees are growing. Due to a longer growing season, sometimes extended by 3 weeks per year, trees are able to grow faster. Beech and Spruce trees have seen an increase in growth rate by up to 77% since 1870. However, the higher temperatures which allow for the longer seasons, combined with pollution, are making wood weaker. This makes the trees vulnerable to breaking and the lumber less durable. Researchers at @tu.muenchen studied four types of trees and found that wood density has decreased by 8% since 1870 as well. Though 8% may seem like a small number, it has big impacts on our climate. Trees are one of our best resources in fighting the amount of carbon in the atmosphere. The researchers also found that as the density dropped, the tree’s carbon content did too by a whopping 50%, meaning less dense trees can absorb less carbon. One environmental scientist at @universityofhelsinki believes though, that with faster growing forests, the change in density of individual trees may become less important. Keeping our forests alive and well is a vital act in fighting climate change 🌲🌲🌲

Climate change is affecting the way trees are growing. Due to a longer growing season, sometimes extended by 3 weeks per year, trees are able to grow faster. Beech and Spruce trees have seen an increase in growth rate by up to 77% since 1870. However, the higher temperatures which allow for the longer seasons, combined with pollution, are making wood weaker. This makes the trees vulnerable to breaking and the lumber less durable. Researchers at @tu.muenchen studied four types of trees and found that wood density has decreased by 8% since 1870 as well. Though 8% may seem like a small number, it has big impacts on our climate. Trees are one of our best resources in fighting the amount of carbon in the atmosphere. The researchers also found that as the density dropped, the tree’s carbon content did too by a whopping 50%, meaning less dense trees can absorb less carbon. One environmental scientist at @universityofhelsinki believes though, that with faster growing forests, the change in density of individual trees may become less important. Keeping our forests alive and well is a vital act in fighting climate change 🌲🌲🌲

View in Instagram ⇒