About 2.5 million breeding pairs of Adélie penguins live in Antarctica and nearby islands including the South Orkney and South Sandwich islands. In the South Orkney Islands, climate change may be endangering the penguins’ ability to breed. @NASA states, “The penguins are experiencing population declines along the West Antarctic Peninsula, which is one of the most rapidly warming places on Earth. Conversely, Adélie populations in other areas of Antarctica where the climate is stable or even cooling remain steady or are increasing.” Krill, which is their primary food source, has declined by up to 50 percent since 1976 because of rising temperature and loss of ice. In response to this reduced food supply, breeding Adélie penguins decreased by about 47 percent from 1987 to 2004. Research from the University of Delaware suggests that 60% of the current Adélie penguin habitat could be unfit to host colonies by 2100. In 2017, 18,000 chicks starved to death when their parents had to travel further than usual to find food because of a record amount of summer sea ice. Scientists and @wwf called for establishing a marine protected area (MPA) to prevent tourism and fisheries. How do you think we can better help our feathered friends fight climate change? 🐧 - Years Of Living Dangerously

About 2.5 million breeding pairs of Adélie penguins live in Antarctica and nearby islands including the South Orkney and South Sandwich islands. In the South Orkney Islands, climate change may be endangering the penguins’ ability to breed. @NASA states, “The penguins are experiencing population declines along the West Antarctic Peninsula, which is one of the most rapidly warming places on Earth. Conversely, Adélie populations in other areas of Antarctica where the climate is stable or even cooling remain steady or are increasing.” Krill, which is their primary food source, has declined by up to 50 percent since 1976 because of rising temperature and loss of ice. In response to this reduced food supply, breeding Adélie penguins decreased by about 47 percent from 1987 to 2004. Research from the University of Delaware suggests that 60% of the current Adélie penguin habitat could be unfit to host colonies by 2100. In 2017, 18,000 chicks starved to death when their parents had to travel further than usual to find food because of a record amount of summer sea ice. Scientists and @wwf called for establishing a marine protected area (MPA) to prevent tourism and fisheries. How do you think we can better help our feathered friends fight climate change? 🐧

About 2.5 million breeding pairs of Adélie penguins live in Antarctica and nearby islands including the South Orkney and South Sandwich islands. In the South Orkney Islands, climate change may be endangering the penguins’ ability to breed. @NASA states, “The penguins are experiencing population declines along the West Antarctic Peninsula, which is one of the most rapidly warming places on Earth. Conversely, Adélie populations in other areas of Antarctica where the climate is stable or even cooling remain steady or are increasing.” Krill, which is their primary food source, has declined by up to 50 percent since 1976 because of rising temperature and loss of ice. In response to this reduced food supply, breeding Adélie penguins decreased by about 47 percent from 1987 to 2004. Research from the University of Delaware suggests that 60% of the current Adélie penguin habitat could be unfit to host colonies by 2100. In 2017, 18,000 chicks starved to death when their parents had to travel further than usual to find food because of a record amount of summer sea ice. Scientists and @wwf called for establishing a marine protected area (MPA) to prevent tourism and fisheries. How do you think we can better help our feathered friends fight climate change? 🐧

About 2.5 million breeding pairs of Adélie penguins live in Antarctica and nearby islands including the South Orkney and South Sandwich islands. In the South Orkney Islands, climate change may be endangering the penguins’ ability to breed. @NASA states, “The penguins are experiencing population declines along the West Antarctic Peninsula, which is one of the most rapidly warming places on Earth. Conversely, Adélie populations in other areas of Antarctica where the climate is stable or even cooling remain steady or are increasing.” Krill, which is their primary food source, has declined by up to 50 percent since 1976 because of rising temperature and loss of ice. In response to this reduced food supply, breeding Adélie penguins decreased by about 47 percent from 1987 to 2004. Research from the University of Delaware suggests that 60% of the current Adélie penguin habitat could be unfit to host colonies by 2100. In 2017, 18,000 chicks starved to death when their parents had to travel further than usual to find food because of a record amount of summer sea ice. Scientists and @wwf called for establishing a marine protected area (MPA) to prevent tourism and fisheries. How do you think we can better help our feathered friends fight climate change? 🐧

Photo taken at: South Orkney Islands

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