Instagram Archive - Years Of Living Dangerously

We all love a good bargain, but our inclination for cheap clothing is harming the environment. Fast fashion is accountable for 20% of industrial water pollution, and textile dyeing is the second largest polluter of clean water globally, using 1.3 trillion gallons of water each year. Our consumerism plays a large part in the size of theses numbers. Fast fashion goes through 50-100 microseasons per year, as opposed to the traditional two, Fall/Winter and Spring/Summer. Having more seasons in the year forces companies to produce more clothing at a faster rate, resulting in overuse of water and cotton. Cotton accounts for 33% of all fibers found in textiles, but growing this crop is water intensive–one cotton shirt uses 2,700 L. If the industry continues to consume at its current rate, we will need three times as many natural resources by 2050. Additionally, many fast-fashion producers use plastic based materials, which when washed contribute to the problem of microplastic pollution. To mitigate the industry’s impact, we can upcycle our clothes, shop secondhand and vintage, and buy staple pieces we know we’ll keep long after the current “microseason” ends. Stores like @buffaloexchange and Cross Roads offer customers a cash out or in store credit option to upcycle clothing. If dragging your unwanted clothes through the city isn’t your style, you can try @thredup, an online store which lets you send in your clothing and can give you either cash or an online credit based on what they accept. Any clothing that was not chosen to be resold will be recycled responsibly. If you want a bright and shiny new piece of clothing, brands like @reformation and @girlfriend use fabrics from recycled material to make unique, high quality products. Do you shop sustainably? Let us know in the comments below 👚👔👗

We all love a good bargain, but our inclination for cheap clothing is harming the environment. Fast fashion is accountable for 20% of industrial water pollution, and textile dyeing is the second largest polluter of clean water globally, using 1.3 trillion gallons of water each year. Our consumerism plays a large part in the size of theses numbers. Fast fashion goes through 50-100 microseasons per year, as opposed to the traditional two, Fall/Winter and Spring/Summer. Having more seasons in the year forces companies to produce more clothing at a faster rate, resulting in overuse of water and cotton. Cotton accounts for 33% of all fibers found in textiles, but growing this crop is water intensive–one cotton shirt uses 2,700 L. If the industry continues to consume at its current rate, we will need three times as many natural resources by 2050. Additionally, many fast-fashion producers use plastic based materials, which when washed contribute to the problem of microplastic pollution.
To mitigate the industry’s impact, we can upcycle our clothes, shop secondhand and vintage, and buy staple pieces we know we’ll keep long after the current “microseason” ends. Stores like @buffaloexchange and Cross Roads offer customers a cash out or in store credit option to upcycle clothing. If dragging your unwanted clothes through the city isn’t your style, you can try @thredup, an online store which lets you send in your clothing and can give you either cash or an online credit based on what they accept. Any clothing that was not chosen to be resold will be recycled responsibly. If you want a bright and shiny new piece of clothing, brands like @reformation and @girlfriend use fabrics from recycled material to make unique, high quality products. Do you shop sustainably? Let us know in the comments below 👚👔👗

We all love a good bargain, but our inclination for cheap clothing is harming the environment. Fast fashion is accountable for 20% of industrial water pollution, and textile dyeing is the second largest polluter of clean water globally, using 1.3 trillion gallons of water each year. Our consumerism plays a large part in the size of theses numbers. Fast fashion goes through 50-100 microseasons per year, as opposed to the traditional two, Fall/Winter and Spring/Summer. Having more seasons in the year forces companies to produce more clothing at a faster rate, resulting in overuse of water and cotton. Cotton accounts for 33% of all fibers found in textiles, but growing this crop is water intensive–one cotton shirt uses 2,700 L. If the industry continues to consume at its current rate, we will need three times as many natural resources by 2050. Additionally, many fast-fashion producers use plastic based materials, which when washed contribute to the problem of microplastic pollution.
To mitigate the industry’s impact, we can upcycle our clothes, shop secondhand and vintage, and buy staple pieces we know we’ll keep long after the current “microseason” ends. Stores like @buffaloexchange and Cross Roads offer customers a cash out or in store credit option to upcycle clothing. If dragging your unwanted clothes through the city isn’t your style, you can try @thredup, an online store which lets you send in your clothing and can give you either cash or an online credit based on what they accept. Any clothing that was not chosen to be resold will be recycled responsibly. If you want a bright and shiny new piece of clothing, brands like @reformation and @girlfriend use fabrics from recycled material to make unique, high quality products. Do you shop sustainably? Let us know in the comments below 👚👔👗

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International tourism accounts for 8% of global carbon emissions. A recent study published in the journal “Nature Climate Change” completed a total life cycle assessment of tourism by calculating transportation, accommodation, food, souvenirs, infrastructure and other key factors. The study found global tourism creates 4.5 billion tons of carbon dioxide annually. Visitors traveling to the United States and citizens from the US traveling elsewhere are collectively responsible for one billion metric tons of CO2 per year. Looking to lower your impact? Ditch the plane for a train, take local public transportation, buy souvenirs from local artisans, carry a reusable water bottle and conserve water no matter where you’re traveling. How will you lower your footprint the next time you travel? ✈️

International tourism accounts for 8% of global carbon emissions. A recent study published in the journal “Nature Climate Change” completed a total life cycle assessment of tourism by calculating transportation, accommodation, food, souvenirs, infrastructure and other key factors. The study found global tourism creates 4.5 billion tons of carbon dioxide annually. Visitors traveling to the United States and citizens from the US traveling elsewhere are collectively responsible for one billion metric tons of CO2 per year. Looking to lower your impact? Ditch the plane for a train, take local public transportation, buy souvenirs from local artisans, carry a reusable water bottle and conserve water no matter where you’re traveling. How will you lower your footprint the next time you travel? ✈️

International tourism accounts for 8% of global carbon emissions. A recent study published in the journal “Nature Climate Change” completed a total life cycle assessment of tourism by calculating transportation, accommodation, food, souvenirs, infrastructure and other key factors. The study found global tourism creates 4.5 billion tons of carbon dioxide annually. Visitors traveling to the United States and citizens from the US traveling elsewhere are collectively responsible for one billion metric tons of CO2 per year. Looking to lower your impact? Ditch the plane for a train, take local public transportation, buy souvenirs from local artisans, carry a reusable water bottle and conserve water no matter where you’re traveling. How will you lower your footprint the next time you travel? ✈️

Photo taken at: Checkpoint Charlie

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About 2.5 million breeding pairs of Adélie penguins live in Antarctica and nearby islands including the South Orkney and South Sandwich islands. In the South Orkney Islands, climate change may be endangering the penguins’ ability to breed. @NASA states, “The penguins are experiencing population declines along the West Antarctic Peninsula, which is one of the most rapidly warming places on Earth. Conversely, Adélie populations in other areas of Antarctica where the climate is stable or even cooling remain steady or are increasing.” Krill, which is their primary food source, has declined by up to 50 percent since 1976 because of rising temperature and loss of ice. In response to this reduced food supply, breeding Adélie penguins decreased by about 47 percent from 1987 to 2004. Research from the University of Delaware suggests that 60% of the current Adélie penguin habitat could be unfit to host colonies by 2100. In 2017, 18,000 chicks starved to death when their parents had to travel further than usual to find food because of a record amount of summer sea ice. Scientists and @wwf called for establishing a marine protected area (MPA) to prevent tourism and fisheries. How do you think we can better help our feathered friends fight climate change? 🐧

About 2.5 million breeding pairs of Adélie penguins live in Antarctica and nearby islands including the South Orkney and South Sandwich islands. In the South Orkney Islands, climate change may be endangering the penguins’ ability to breed. @NASA states, “The penguins are experiencing population declines along the West Antarctic Peninsula, which is one of the most rapidly warming places on Earth. Conversely, Adélie populations in other areas of Antarctica where the climate is stable or even cooling remain steady or are increasing.” Krill, which is their primary food source, has declined by up to 50 percent since 1976 because of rising temperature and loss of ice. In response to this reduced food supply, breeding Adélie penguins decreased by about 47 percent from 1987 to 2004. Research from the University of Delaware suggests that 60% of the current Adélie penguin habitat could be unfit to host colonies by 2100. In 2017, 18,000 chicks starved to death when their parents had to travel further than usual to find food because of a record amount of summer sea ice. Scientists and @wwf called for establishing a marine protected area (MPA) to prevent tourism and fisheries. How do you think we can better help our feathered friends fight climate change? 🐧

About 2.5 million breeding pairs of Adélie penguins live in Antarctica and nearby islands including the South Orkney and South Sandwich islands. In the South Orkney Islands, climate change may be endangering the penguins’ ability to breed. @NASA states, “The penguins are experiencing population declines along the West Antarctic Peninsula, which is one of the most rapidly warming places on Earth. Conversely, Adélie populations in other areas of Antarctica where the climate is stable or even cooling remain steady or are increasing.” Krill, which is their primary food source, has declined by up to 50 percent since 1976 because of rising temperature and loss of ice. In response to this reduced food supply, breeding Adélie penguins decreased by about 47 percent from 1987 to 2004. Research from the University of Delaware suggests that 60% of the current Adélie penguin habitat could be unfit to host colonies by 2100. In 2017, 18,000 chicks starved to death when their parents had to travel further than usual to find food because of a record amount of summer sea ice. Scientists and @wwf called for establishing a marine protected area (MPA) to prevent tourism and fisheries. How do you think we can better help our feathered friends fight climate change? 🐧

Photo taken at: South Orkney Islands

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Sweden is turning its trash into energy, heating houses and powering vehicles. Swedish households recycle 49% of their waste, incinerate 50% in power plants, and leave only 1% in landfills. When trash burns, the heat is transformed into steam and generates electricity by spinning turbines. Swedish people also use this technique to produce methane biogas, which runs more than 200 city buses, some taxis, and private vehicles. Waste-power plants seem to be an alternative to landfills and prevent burning other fossil fuels but, waste-power plants still release carbon dioxide, a major component responsible for climate change. This method is also used in Japan and China and may be the first step to reduce garbage in landfills if used in combination with recycling. How does your city, state, or country recycle? Let us know in the comments below 🔥♻️

Sweden is turning its trash into energy, heating houses and powering vehicles. Swedish households recycle 49% of their waste, incinerate 50% in power plants, and leave only 1% in landfills. When trash burns, the heat is transformed into steam and generates electricity by spinning turbines. Swedish people also use this technique to produce methane biogas, which runs more than 200 city buses, some taxis, and private vehicles. Waste-power plants seem to be an alternative to landfills and prevent burning other fossil fuels but, waste-power plants still release carbon dioxide, a major component responsible for climate change. This method is also used in Japan and China and may be the first step to reduce garbage in landfills if used in combination with recycling. How does your city, state, or country recycle? Let us know in the comments below 🔥♻️

Sweden is turning its trash into energy, heating houses and powering vehicles. Swedish households recycle 49% of their waste, incinerate 50% in power plants, and leave only 1% in landfills. When trash burns, the heat is transformed into steam and generates electricity by spinning turbines. Swedish people also use this technique to produce methane biogas, which runs more than 200 city buses, some taxis, and private vehicles. Waste-power plants seem to be an alternative to landfills and prevent burning other fossil fuels but, waste-power plants still release carbon dioxide, a major component responsible for climate change. This method is also used in Japan and China and may be the first step to reduce garbage in landfills if used in combination with recycling. How does your city, state, or country recycle? Let us know in the comments below 🔥♻️

Photo taken at: Sweden

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Climate change is affecting the way trees are growing. Due to a longer growing season, sometimes extended by 3 weeks per year, trees are able to grow faster. Beech and Spruce trees have seen an increase in growth rate by up to 77% since 1870. However, the higher temperatures which allow for the longer seasons, combined with pollution, are making wood weaker. This makes the trees vulnerable to breaking and the lumber less durable. Researchers at @tu.muenchen studied four types of trees and found that wood density has decreased by 8% since 1870 as well. Though 8% may seem like a small number, it has big impacts on our climate. Trees are one of our best resources in fighting the amount of carbon in the atmosphere. The researchers also found that as the density dropped, the tree’s carbon content did too by a whopping 50%, meaning less dense trees can absorb less carbon. One environmental scientist at @universityofhelsinki believes though, that with faster growing forests, the change in density of individual trees may become less important. Keeping our forests alive and well is a vital act in fighting climate change 🌲🌲🌲

Climate change is affecting the way trees are growing. Due to a longer growing season, sometimes extended by 3 weeks per year, trees are able to grow faster. Beech and Spruce trees have seen an increase in growth rate by up to 77% since 1870. However, the higher temperatures which allow for the longer seasons, combined with pollution, are making wood weaker. This makes the trees vulnerable to breaking and the lumber less durable. Researchers at @tu.muenchen studied four types of trees and found that wood density has decreased by 8% since 1870 as well. Though 8% may seem like a small number, it has big impacts on our climate. Trees are one of our best resources in fighting the amount of carbon in the atmosphere. The researchers also found that as the density dropped, the tree’s carbon content did too by a whopping 50%, meaning less dense trees can absorb less carbon. One environmental scientist at @universityofhelsinki believes though, that with faster growing forests, the change in density of individual trees may become less important. Keeping our forests alive and well is a vital act in fighting climate change 🌲🌲🌲

Climate change is affecting the way trees are growing. Due to a longer growing season, sometimes extended by 3 weeks per year, trees are able to grow faster. Beech and Spruce trees have seen an increase in growth rate by up to 77% since 1870. However, the higher temperatures which allow for the longer seasons, combined with pollution, are making wood weaker. This makes the trees vulnerable to breaking and the lumber less durable. Researchers at @tu.muenchen studied four types of trees and found that wood density has decreased by 8% since 1870 as well. Though 8% may seem like a small number, it has big impacts on our climate. Trees are one of our best resources in fighting the amount of carbon in the atmosphere. The researchers also found that as the density dropped, the tree’s carbon content did too by a whopping 50%, meaning less dense trees can absorb less carbon. One environmental scientist at @universityofhelsinki believes though, that with faster growing forests, the change in density of individual trees may become less important. Keeping our forests alive and well is a vital act in fighting climate change 🌲🌲🌲

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Google has developed a new tool to estimate local carbon pollution. The company currently tracks greenhouse-gas emissions for five cities including Pittsburg (PA), Mountain View (CA), and Melbourne (AUS). Google plans to expand the feature, called the “Environmental Insights Explorer,” by using Google Maps and Waze to collect transportation information in more cities. The goal is to raise awareness among local leaders to focus and improve local climate programs and utilize the tool to help imagine a more sustainable city. The program uses some data from another Google project, Project Sunroof, which shows the location of houses with solar panels. Explorer adds an estimation of rooftop surface available to set up solar panels in a city, but the tool has its limits. It can only estimate carbon emissions from electricity and transportation, while industries and agriculture represent about a third of U.S. emissions over all. Additionally, the age of some data set published by the EPA distorts Google’s data accuracy. Google prefers to provide local data and does not want to compete with the EPA, which is planning to estimate greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S. at the national level. Do you think tech companies can help local policies to be more eco-friendly? Let us know in the comments below ☟

Google has developed a new tool to estimate local carbon pollution. The company currently tracks greenhouse-gas emissions for five cities including Pittsburg (PA), Mountain View (CA), and Melbourne (AUS). Google plans to expand the feature, called the “Environmental Insights Explorer,” by using Google Maps and Waze to collect transportation information in more cities. The goal is to raise awareness among local leaders to focus and improve local climate programs and utilize the tool to help imagine a more sustainable city. The program uses some data from another Google project, Project Sunroof, which shows the location of houses with solar panels. Explorer adds an estimation of rooftop surface available to set up solar panels in a city, but the tool has its limits. It can only estimate carbon emissions from electricity and transportation, while industries and agriculture represent about a third of U.S. emissions over all. Additionally, the age of some data set published by the EPA distorts Google’s data accuracy. Google prefers to provide local data and does not want to compete with the EPA, which is planning to estimate greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S. at the national level. Do you think tech companies can help local policies to be more eco-friendly? Let us know in the comments below ☟

Google has developed a new tool to estimate local carbon pollution. The company currently tracks greenhouse-gas emissions for five cities including Pittsburg (PA), Mountain View (CA), and Melbourne (AUS). Google plans to expand the feature, called the “Environmental Insights Explorer,” by using Google Maps and Waze to collect transportation information in more cities. The goal is to raise awareness among local leaders to focus and improve local climate programs and utilize the tool to help imagine a more sustainable city. The program uses some data from another Google project, Project Sunroof, which shows the location of houses with solar panels. Explorer adds an estimation of rooftop surface available to set up solar panels in a city, but the tool has its limits. It can only estimate carbon emissions from electricity and transportation, while industries and agriculture represent about a third of U.S. emissions over all. Additionally, the age of some data set published by the EPA distorts Google’s data accuracy. Google prefers to provide local data and does not want to compete with the EPA, which is planning to estimate greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S. at the national level. Do you think tech companies can help local policies to be more eco-friendly? Let us know in the comments below ☟

Photo taken at: Google HQ Mountain View – California

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Microplastics are all over, even in the sky, carried in the bodies of insects. These plastics are dangerous due to their small size, making them hard to identify but, easy to absorb. They can harbour bacteria, leach toxic chemicals and get stuck in the digestive tracts of animals and humans alike. In a recent study published in the journal “Biology Letters”, researchers fed fluorescent microplastic particles to mosquito larvae and found the mosquitoes carried the microplastic into adulthood. This study suggests microplastics pose a threat to terrestrial birds and other insect eating creatures, and it won’t end soon as plastic production is expected to climb 40% within the next decade. Although there has been limited research on the effects of microplastics on wildlife and humans before this study, we know that many microplastics are fibres shed by synthetic clothing while in washers. A single wash can release 700,000 fibres. “We emit billion of plastic fibres every year, many which go straight into rivers” says Matt Shardlow, chief executive of the conservation charity Buglife. Elevating ocean temperatures due to climate change are increasing the rates of evaporation which leave higher concentrations of saltwater. This in turn, increases the amount of plastics that are found at the surface level. One of the researchers, Professor Callaghan, concluded, “You could have a lot of plastic going up. It’s totally depressing. These plastics are going to be around forever.” ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Photo credit: @chesbayprogram–this photo has been colored from its original form.

Microplastics are all over, even in the sky, carried in the bodies of insects. These plastics are dangerous due to their small size, making them hard to identify but, easy to absorb. They can harbour bacteria, leach toxic chemicals and get stuck in the digestive tracts of animals and humans alike. In a recent study published in the journal “Biology Letters”, researchers fed fluorescent microplastic particles to mosquito larvae and found the mosquitoes carried the microplastic into adulthood. This study suggests microplastics pose a threat to terrestrial birds and other insect eating creatures, and it won’t end soon as plastic production is expected to climb 40% within the next decade. Although there has been limited research on the effects of microplastics on wildlife and humans before this study, we know that many microplastics are fibres shed by synthetic clothing while in washers. A single wash can release 700,000 fibres. “We emit billion of plastic fibres every year, many which go straight into rivers” says Matt Shardlow, chief executive of the conservation charity Buglife. Elevating ocean temperatures due to climate change are increasing the rates of evaporation which leave higher concentrations of saltwater. This in turn, increases the amount of plastics that are found at the surface level. One of the researchers, Professor Callaghan, concluded, “You could have a lot of plastic going up. It’s totally depressing. These plastics are going to be around forever.” ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Photo credit: @chesbayprogram–this photo has been colored from its original form.

Microplastics are all over, even in the sky, carried in the bodies of insects. These plastics are dangerous due to their small size, making them hard to identify but, easy to absorb. They can harbour bacteria, leach toxic chemicals and get stuck in the digestive tracts of animals and humans alike. In a recent study published in the journal “Biology Letters”, researchers fed fluorescent microplastic particles to mosquito larvae and found the mosquitoes carried the microplastic into adulthood. This study suggests microplastics pose a threat to terrestrial birds and other insect eating creatures, and it won’t end soon as plastic production is expected to climb 40% within the next decade. Although there has been limited research on the effects of microplastics on wildlife and humans before this study, we know that many microplastics are fibres shed by synthetic clothing while in washers. A single wash can release 700,000 fibres. “We emit billion of plastic fibres every year, many which go straight into rivers” says Matt Shardlow, chief executive of the conservation charity Buglife. Elevating ocean temperatures due to climate change are increasing the rates of evaporation which leave higher concentrations of saltwater. This in turn, increases the amount of plastics that are found at the surface level. One of the researchers, Professor Callaghan, concluded, “You could have a lot of plastic going up. It’s totally depressing. These plastics are going to be around forever.” ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Photo credit: @chesbayprogram–this photo has been colored from its original form.

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We’ve known for some time that our carbon and water footprints are connected, but the full extent of that relationship has not been thoroughly investigated since 1980. A new study in the journal “Environmental Science and Technology” estimates that the U.S. energy sector has collectively withdrawn 58 trillion gallons of water from various sources just to cool power plants and grow corn for ethanol production. The water used is often returned to its source at a higher temperature, which reduces the amount of soluble oxygen in the water, unnaturally speeding up evaporation, and increasing the likelihood of toxic algae growth. To avoid exacerbating this problem, we must make an effort to reduce both our carbon and water footprints. On average, it takes about 25 gallons of water to produce just one kilowatt-hour of energy. You can monitor your kWh usage by checking your electric bill each month. Do you know your water or carbon footprint? Let us know in the comments below 💧✨💡

We’ve known for some time that our carbon and water footprints are connected, but the full extent of that relationship has not been thoroughly investigated since 1980. A new study in the journal “Environmental Science and Technology” estimates that the U.S. energy sector has collectively withdrawn 58 trillion gallons of water from various sources just to cool power plants and grow corn for ethanol production. The water used is often returned to its source at a higher temperature, which reduces the amount of soluble oxygen in the water, unnaturally speeding up evaporation, and increasing the likelihood of toxic algae growth. To avoid exacerbating this problem, we must make an effort to reduce both our carbon and water footprints. On average, it takes about 25 gallons of water to produce just one kilowatt-hour of energy. You can monitor your kWh usage by checking your electric bill each month. Do you know your water or carbon footprint? Let us know in the comments below 💧✨💡

We’ve known for some time that our carbon and water footprints are connected, but the full extent of that relationship has not been thoroughly investigated since 1980. A new study in the journal “Environmental Science and Technology” estimates that the U.S. energy sector has collectively withdrawn 58 trillion gallons of water from various sources just to cool power plants and grow corn for ethanol production. The water used is often returned to its source at a higher temperature, which reduces the amount of soluble oxygen in the water, unnaturally speeding up evaporation, and increasing the likelihood of toxic algae growth. To avoid exacerbating this problem, we must make an effort to reduce both our carbon and water footprints. On average, it takes about 25 gallons of water to produce just one kilowatt-hour of energy. You can monitor your kWh usage by checking your electric bill each month. Do you know your water or carbon footprint? Let us know in the comments below 💧✨💡

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“Karenia brevis” is the toxic algae responsible for causing “red tide” and killing hundreds of marine life including some endangered animals along the Florida coast earlier this year, and it’s unlikely to disappear any time soon. In a letter published by the journal “Environmental Science & Technology,” researchers stated that “climate change will severely affect our ability to control blooms, and in some cases make it nearly impossible.” Karenia brevis has shown it can thrive in high temperatures, but grow exponentially faster with the presence of more carbon dioxide. The atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide surpassed 400 parts per million in 2015 and will continue to rise in the future. In addition, nitrogen rich runoff, shallow coastal waters and saltier water caused by droughts all make the survival rate for algae much higher than usual. Aside from it’s deadly encounter with marine life, red tide also causes respiratory problems for residents close to the affected areas and hurts the local economy because of the putrid smell of dead animals along the coastline. Have you experienced the red tide?

“Karenia brevis” is the toxic algae responsible for causing “red tide” and killing hundreds of marine life including some endangered animals along the Florida coast earlier this year, and it’s unlikely to disappear any time soon. In a letter published by the journal “Environmental Science & Technology,” researchers stated that “climate change will severely affect our ability to control blooms, and in some cases make it nearly impossible.” Karenia brevis has shown it can thrive in high temperatures, but grow exponentially faster with the presence of more carbon dioxide. The atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide surpassed 400 parts per million in 2015 and will continue to rise in the future. In addition, nitrogen rich runoff, shallow coastal waters and saltier water caused by droughts all make the survival rate for algae much higher than usual. Aside from it’s deadly encounter with marine life, red tide also causes respiratory problems for residents close to the affected areas and hurts the local economy because of the putrid smell of dead animals along the coastline. Have you experienced the red tide?

“Karenia brevis” is the toxic algae responsible for causing “red tide” and killing hundreds of marine life including some endangered animals along the Florida coast earlier this year, and it’s unlikely to disappear any time soon. In a letter published by the journal “Environmental Science & Technology,” researchers stated that “climate change will severely affect our ability to control blooms, and in some cases make it nearly impossible.” Karenia brevis has shown it can thrive in high temperatures, but grow exponentially faster with the presence of more carbon dioxide. The atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide surpassed 400 parts per million in 2015 and will continue to rise in the future. In addition, nitrogen rich runoff, shallow coastal waters and saltier water caused by droughts all make the survival rate for algae much higher than usual. Aside from it’s deadly encounter with marine life, red tide also causes respiratory problems for residents close to the affected areas and hurts the local economy because of the putrid smell of dead animals along the coastline. Have you experienced the red tide?

Photo taken at: Saint Petersburg, Florida

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Climate change could impact the way we travel. Rising temperatures are making it increasingly difficult for planes to take-off due to the difference in density when air is hot versus cold. In order to combat these changes, airplanes would need to limit passengers, cargo, and fuel to get the same lift on a hot day and a cooler one. This would inevitably raise flight costs to accommodate the stricter guidelines. According to Ethan Coffel, an atmospheric scientist at @columbia, airlines may need to implement stronger weight restrictions, rescheduling flights to cooler times of the day or lenghething runways to adapt to climate change. In addition to take off troubles, flights will also feel different while in the air. Flights west will be slower and bumpier with increased delays due to weather. Similarly, climate change has pushed planes to fly at higher altitudes to avoid turbulent weather conditions, increasing the risk of high altitude icing–engine failure caused by tiny particles of ice infiltrating turbofan engines. In recent years, high altitude icing has been the cause of over 100 aircraft engine failures. Climate change would not only put planes at risk in the sky, but also on the ground. Many major airports are built on low, flat land next to major waterways, making them vulnerable to rising sea levels and periodic flooding. Airports all over the world from China to New York’s LaGuardia airport have started renovations to combat the changing climate. Do you think these changes will fly? Comment down below 🛫

Climate change could impact the way we travel. Rising temperatures are making it increasingly difficult for planes to take-off due to the difference in density when air is hot versus cold. In order to combat these changes, airplanes would need to limit passengers, cargo, and fuel to get the same lift on a hot day and a cooler one. This would inevitably raise flight costs to accommodate the stricter guidelines. According to Ethan Coffel, an atmospheric scientist at @columbia, airlines may need to implement stronger weight restrictions, rescheduling flights to cooler times of the day or lenghething runways to adapt to climate change. In addition to take off troubles, flights will also feel different while in the air. Flights west will be slower and bumpier with increased delays due to weather. Similarly, climate change has pushed planes to fly at higher altitudes to avoid turbulent weather conditions, increasing the risk of high altitude icing–engine failure caused by tiny particles of ice infiltrating turbofan engines. In recent years, high altitude icing has been the cause of over 100 aircraft engine failures. Climate change would not only put planes at risk in the sky, but also on the ground. Many major airports are built on low, flat land next to major waterways, making them vulnerable to rising sea levels and periodic flooding. Airports all over the world from China to New York’s LaGuardia airport have started renovations to combat the changing climate. Do you think these changes will fly? Comment down below 🛫

Climate change could impact the way we travel. Rising temperatures are making it increasingly difficult for planes to take-off due to the difference in density when air is hot versus cold. In order to combat these changes, airplanes would need to limit passengers, cargo, and fuel to get the same lift on a hot day and a cooler one. This would inevitably raise flight costs to accommodate the stricter guidelines. According to Ethan Coffel, an atmospheric scientist at @columbia, airlines may need to implement stronger weight restrictions, rescheduling flights to cooler times of the day or lenghething runways to adapt to climate change. In addition to take off troubles, flights will also feel different while in the air. Flights west will be slower and bumpier with increased delays due to weather. Similarly, climate change has pushed planes to fly at higher altitudes to avoid turbulent weather conditions, increasing the risk of high altitude icing–engine failure caused by tiny particles of ice infiltrating turbofan engines. In recent years, high altitude icing has been the cause of over 100 aircraft engine failures. Climate change would not only put planes at risk in the sky, but also on the ground. Many major airports are built on low, flat land next to major waterways, making them vulnerable to rising sea levels and periodic flooding. Airports all over the world from China to New York’s LaGuardia airport have started renovations to combat the changing climate. Do you think these changes will fly? Comment down below 🛫

Photo taken at: Gran Canaria Airport

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