Instagram Archive - Years Of Living Dangerously

In Minneapolis, Minnesota, a church and a mosque are partnering on an innovative energy project called Community Solar. It will generate enough power for both institutions and 26 homes in the community. @SierraClub⠀ ⠀ #YEARSproject #climatechange #SierraClub #Minnesota #communitysolar #renewableenergy

In Minneapolis, Minnesota, a church and a mosque are partnering on an innovative energy project called Community Solar. It will generate enough power for both institutions and 26 homes in the community. @SierraClub⠀

#YEARSproject #climatechange #SierraClub #Minnesota #communitysolar #renewableenergy

In Minneapolis, Minnesota, a church and a mosque are partnering on an innovative energy project called Community Solar. It will generate enough power for both institutions and 26 homes in the community. @SierraClub⠀
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#YEARSproject #climatechange #SierraClub #Minnesota #communitysolar #renewableenergy

Photo taken at: Minneapolis, Minnesota

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Did you know your pet’s carbon footprint could be as big as your car’s? There’s an ongoing trend to feed our furry friends human quality meat and it’s a serious contributor to climate change. If pets were a country, they would be 5th in global meat consumption due to owners’ misconception more meat equals better health. Red meat accounts for 10-40 times more greenhouse gas emissions than grains do, and 80% of the Amazon’s deforestation is linked to cattle ranching. Experts across industries agree meat-heavy diets are not inherently better for your animal’s health than less meat-heavy options. Unlike humans, dogs and cats can consume animal by-products, like organs, that may otherwise end up in the landfill. Next time you’re at the vet, ask what other food options might work for your pet. Have some brand suggestions? Write them in the comments below! ▪︎ ▪︎ ▪︎ ▪︎ ▪︎ ##YEARSproject #climatechange #pets #dog #cat #petfood #meat #greenhousegases #mansbestfriend #furryfriends #doggie #kitty #carbonfootprint #fourleggedfriends

Did you know your pet’s carbon footprint could be as big as your car’s? There’s an ongoing trend to feed our furry friends human quality meat and it’s a serious contributor to climate change. If pets were a country, they would be 5th in global meat consumption due to owners’ misconception more meat equals better health. Red meat accounts for 10-40 times more greenhouse gas emissions than grains do, and 80% of the Amazon’s deforestation is linked to cattle ranching. Experts across industries agree meat-heavy diets are not inherently better for your animal’s health than less meat-heavy options. Unlike humans, dogs and cats can consume animal by-products, like organs, that may otherwise end up in the landfill. Next time you’re at the vet, ask what other food options might work for your pet. Have some brand suggestions? Write them in the comments below!
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##YEARSproject #climatechange #pets #dog #cat #petfood #meat #greenhousegases #mansbestfriend #furryfriends #doggie #kitty #carbonfootprint #fourleggedfriends

Did you know your pet’s carbon footprint could be as big as your car’s? There’s an ongoing trend to feed our furry friends human quality meat and it’s a serious contributor to climate change. If pets were a country, they would be 5th in global meat consumption due to owners’ misconception more meat equals better health. Red meat accounts for 10-40 times more greenhouse gas emissions than grains do, and 80% of the Amazon’s deforestation is linked to cattle ranching. Experts across industries agree meat-heavy diets are not inherently better for your animal’s health than less meat-heavy options. Unlike humans, dogs and cats can consume animal by-products, like organs, that may otherwise end up in the landfill. Next time you’re at the vet, ask what other food options might work for your pet. Have some brand suggestions? Write them in the comments below!
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##YEARSproject #climatechange #pets #dog #cat #petfood #meat #greenhousegases #mansbestfriend #furryfriends #doggie #kitty #carbonfootprint #fourleggedfriends

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Migrants from Central America are on their way to the U.S border seeking asylum from extreme poverty and violence, and climate change has more to do with this migration than most would think. About a third of all employment in Central America is related to agriculture and any instability in this industry is devastating to a nation’s economy. According to Robert Alberto, a researcher at the Center for Latin American and Latino Studies at @americanuniversity states, “The main reason people are moving is because they don’t have anything to eat. This has a strong link to climate change–we are seeing tremendous climate instability that is radically changing food security in that region.” Extreme weather events have caused massive droughts throughout the region coupled with periodic flash floods, leaving millions struggling to feed themselves. According to the @worldbank, extreme weather will force an estimated 3.9 million climate migrants to leave Central America over the next thirty years. Francesco Femia, the president of the Center for Climate and Security, suggests that the best way to protect ourselves from outward migration and displacement is to “bolster the resilience of those countries so you reduce the likelihood of conflict and reduce the likelihood of displacement that might force outward migration.” Have you or your family felt the effects of climate change in Guatemala, Honduras, or El Salvador? ▪︎ ▪︎ ▪︎ ▪︎ ▪︎ #YEARSproject #migrantcaravan #immigration #migrants #centralamerica #guatemala #honduras #elsalvador #climatechange #poverty #violence #gangviolence #mexico #asylumseekers #latino #foodinsecurity

Migrants from Central America are on their way to the U.S border seeking asylum from extreme poverty and violence, and climate change has more to do with this migration than most would think. About a third of all employment in Central America is related to agriculture and any instability in this industry is devastating to a nation’s economy. According to Robert Alberto, a researcher at the Center for Latin American and Latino Studies at @americanuniversity states, “The main reason people are moving is because they don’t have anything to eat. This has a strong link to climate change–we are seeing tremendous climate instability that is radically changing food security in that region.” Extreme weather events have caused massive droughts throughout the region coupled with periodic flash floods, leaving millions struggling to feed themselves. According to the @worldbank, extreme weather will force an estimated 3.9 million climate migrants to leave Central America over the next thirty years. Francesco Femia, the president of the Center for Climate and Security, suggests that the best way to protect ourselves from outward migration and displacement is to “bolster the resilience of those countries so you reduce the likelihood of conflict and reduce the likelihood of displacement that might force outward migration.” Have you or your family felt the effects of climate change in Guatemala, Honduras, or El Salvador?
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#YEARSproject #migrantcaravan #immigration #migrants #centralamerica #guatemala #honduras #elsalvador #climatechange #poverty #violence #gangviolence #mexico #asylumseekers #latino #foodinsecurity

Migrants from Central America are on their way to the U.S border seeking asylum from extreme poverty and violence, and climate change has more to do with this migration than most would think. About a third of all employment in Central America is related to agriculture and any instability in this industry is devastating to a nation’s economy. According to Robert Alberto, a researcher at the Center for Latin American and Latino Studies at @americanuniversity states, “The main reason people are moving is because they don’t have anything to eat. This has a strong link to climate change–we are seeing tremendous climate instability that is radically changing food security in that region.” Extreme weather events have caused massive droughts throughout the region coupled with periodic flash floods, leaving millions struggling to feed themselves. According to the @worldbank, extreme weather will force an estimated 3.9 million climate migrants to leave Central America over the next thirty years. Francesco Femia, the president of the Center for Climate and Security, suggests that the best way to protect ourselves from outward migration and displacement is to “bolster the resilience of those countries so you reduce the likelihood of conflict and reduce the likelihood of displacement that might force outward migration.” Have you or your family felt the effects of climate change in Guatemala, Honduras, or El Salvador?
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#YEARSproject #migrantcaravan #immigration #migrants #centralamerica #guatemala #honduras #elsalvador #climatechange #poverty #violence #gangviolence #mexico #asylumseekers #latino #foodinsecurity

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Researchers from @floridainternationaluniversity (FIU) are worried that Miami will be submerged by the end of the century. Located along the sea, the Magic City is extremely vulnerable to sea level rise. Scientists forecast that water will increase between 13 and 34 inches by 2060 and up to 86 inches by 2100. Miami Beach committed $500 million to elevate the city and to place pump stations–30 stations of the 80 planned have already been installed to keep the city dry–but the pumps are not a long-term solution to sea level rise. The system has been criticized by scientists and researchers from FIU, @NOAA, @univmiami and @nsuflorida which all claim that the pumps are polluting the water. They recommended that the city set up green infrastructures to treat water and absorb pollutants. In Miami Beach, some roads have been raised higher than the buildings they neighbor, an unsustainable solution as tourism increases. Solutions like reef restoration and wetland preservation are thought of as more long-term actions to help Miami survive sea level rise. A Florida researcher stated Hurricane Irma produced up to 6-foot waves, but without any coral-reef barriers, it could have created waves 20-feet in height. How should the municipalities prevent the city from disaster? ▪︎ ▪︎ ▪︎ ▪︎ ▪︎ #YEARSproject #miami #florida #sealevelrise #climatechange #miamibeach #pump #wave #storm #floridainternationaluniversity

Researchers from @floridainternationaluniversity (FIU) are worried that Miami will be submerged by the end of the century. Located along the sea, the Magic City is extremely vulnerable to sea level rise. Scientists forecast that water will increase between 13 and 34 inches by 2060 and up to 86 inches by 2100. Miami Beach committed $500 million to elevate the city and to place pump stations–30 stations of the 80 planned have already been installed to keep the city dry–but the pumps are not a long-term solution to sea level rise. The system has been criticized by scientists and researchers from FIU, @NOAA, @univmiami and @nsuflorida which all claim that the pumps are polluting the water. They recommended that the city set up green infrastructures to treat water and absorb pollutants. In Miami Beach, some roads have been raised higher than the buildings they neighbor, an unsustainable solution as tourism increases. Solutions like reef restoration and wetland preservation are thought of as more long-term actions to help Miami survive sea level rise. A Florida researcher stated Hurricane Irma produced up to 6-foot waves, but without any coral-reef barriers, it could have created waves 20-feet in height. How should the municipalities prevent the city from disaster?
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#YEARSproject #miami #florida #sealevelrise #climatechange #miamibeach #pump #wave #storm #floridainternationaluniversity

Researchers from @floridainternationaluniversity (FIU) are worried that Miami will be submerged by the end of the century. Located along the sea, the Magic City is extremely vulnerable to sea level rise. Scientists forecast that water will increase between 13 and 34 inches by 2060 and up to 86 inches by 2100. Miami Beach committed $500 million to elevate the city and to place pump stations–30 stations of the 80 planned have already been installed to keep the city dry–but the pumps are not a long-term solution to sea level rise. The system has been criticized by scientists and researchers from FIU, @NOAA, @univmiami and @nsuflorida which all claim that the pumps are polluting the water. They recommended that the city set up green infrastructures to treat water and absorb pollutants. In Miami Beach, some roads have been raised higher than the buildings they neighbor, an unsustainable solution as tourism increases. Solutions like reef restoration and wetland preservation are thought of as more long-term actions to help Miami survive sea level rise. A Florida researcher stated Hurricane Irma produced up to 6-foot waves, but without any coral-reef barriers, it could have created waves 20-feet in height. How should the municipalities prevent the city from disaster?
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#YEARSproject #miami #florida #sealevelrise #climatechange #miamibeach #pump #wave #storm #floridainternationaluniversity

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Climate change poses a direct threat to game hunting in America. For many in rural America, hunting is a way to bond with family and often a historic tradition. It’s also a practical way to control the overpopulation of white-tailed deer–U.S. population is at an estimated 30-35 million. The decline of game animals would also result in the loss of billions of dollars and jobs related to hunting. Nationally, Americans spend upwards of 23 billion dollars on hunting-related purchases and provide the country with 3.5 billion dollars in state, local and federal tax. Game hunting helps fund conservation efforts by allowing government agencies to buy up land and maintain it for future hunters. It also provides research on wildlife and wildlife management programs. As more deer are migrating up north due to climate change, other popular game species like brook trout, moose, sage grouse, pintail and many more are at risk due to extreme weather and ecosystem changes. Droughts, floods, fires and warming winters all affect these animals, exacerbate population decline and contribute to the loss of habitat. The mule deer, for example, has experienced population decline and habitat loss due to droughts and oil and gas developments. The snowshoe hare has been unable to effectively molt with earlier winters, making it an easy target for predators. As a response, the Pennsylvania game commission reduced hare hunting to less than a week in some areas. Moose populations have also been on the decline because warming weather makes them more susceptible to diseases and parasites. If you’re an avid hunter or angler and care about conserving our wildlife check out the link in our bio and click “What We’re Reading” to see how you can make a difference. How do you feel about climate change’s impact on this American tradition? ▪︎ ▪︎ ▪︎ ▪︎ ▪︎ #YEARSproject #deer #trout #jobs #muledeer #climatechange #wildlife #hunting #tradition

Climate change poses a direct threat to game hunting in America. For many in rural America, hunting is a way to bond with family and often a historic tradition. It’s also a practical way to control the overpopulation of white-tailed deer–U.S. population is at an estimated 30-35 million. The decline of game animals would also result in the loss of billions of dollars and jobs related to hunting. Nationally, Americans spend upwards of 23 billion dollars on hunting-related purchases and provide the country with 3.5 billion dollars in state, local and federal tax. Game hunting helps fund conservation efforts by allowing government agencies to buy up land and maintain it for future hunters. It also provides research on wildlife and wildlife management programs.

As more deer are migrating up north due to climate change, other popular game species like brook trout, moose, sage grouse, pintail and many more are at risk due to extreme weather and ecosystem changes. Droughts, floods, fires and warming winters all affect these animals, exacerbate population decline and contribute to the loss of habitat. The mule deer, for example, has experienced population decline and habitat loss due to droughts and oil and gas developments. The snowshoe hare has been unable to effectively molt with earlier winters, making it an easy target for predators. As a response, the Pennsylvania game commission reduced hare hunting to less than a week in some areas. Moose populations have also been on the decline because warming weather makes them more susceptible to diseases and parasites.
If you’re an avid hunter or angler and care about conserving our wildlife check out the link in our bio and click “What We’re Reading” to see how you can make a difference. How do you feel about climate change’s impact on this American tradition?
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#YEARSproject #deer #trout #jobs #muledeer #climatechange #wildlife #hunting #tradition

Climate change poses a direct threat to game hunting in America. For many in rural America, hunting is a way to bond with family and often a historic tradition. It’s also a practical way to control the overpopulation of white-tailed deer–U.S. population is at an estimated 30-35 million. The decline of game animals would also result in the loss of billions of dollars and jobs related to hunting. Nationally, Americans spend upwards of 23 billion dollars on hunting-related purchases and provide the country with 3.5 billion dollars in state, local and federal tax. Game hunting helps fund conservation efforts by allowing government agencies to buy up land and maintain it for future hunters. It also provides research on wildlife and wildlife management programs.

As more deer are migrating up north due to climate change, other popular game species like brook trout, moose, sage grouse, pintail and many more are at risk due to extreme weather and ecosystem changes. Droughts, floods, fires and warming winters all affect these animals, exacerbate population decline and contribute to the loss of habitat. The mule deer, for example, has experienced population decline and habitat loss due to droughts and oil and gas developments. The snowshoe hare has been unable to effectively molt with earlier winters, making it an easy target for predators. As a response, the Pennsylvania game commission reduced hare hunting to less than a week in some areas. Moose populations have also been on the decline because warming weather makes them more susceptible to diseases and parasites. 
If you’re an avid hunter or angler and care about conserving our wildlife check out the link in our bio and click “What We’re Reading” to see how you can make a difference. How do you feel about climate change’s impact on this American tradition?
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#YEARSproject #deer #trout #jobs #muledeer #climatechange #wildlife #hunting #tradition

Photo taken at: Pennsylvania Game Commission

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