Instagram Archive - Years Of Living Dangerously

The Belgian custom of shrimping on horseback is at risk due to climate change. In the tradition, which dates back to the 16th century, fishermen ride through shallow waters with nets attached to their saddles. @unesco has designated the custom as an “intangible cultural heritage,” and the community sees it as integral to its way of life. However, warming waters are attracting other species—particularly jellyfish—to shallow parts of the water, crowding out the shrimp and leading to a lower catch rate. Fishermen are concerned about the change in their waters, but are determined to keep the tradition alive. Have you heard of these horseback shrimpers? Let us know in the comments 🦐 🐎 🇧🇪 ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Photo courtesy of Koksijde Tourism @koksijde_oostduinkerke

The Belgian custom of shrimping on horseback is at risk due to climate change. In the tradition, which dates back to the 16th century, fishermen ride through shallow waters with nets attached to their saddles. @unesco has designated the custom as an “intangible cultural heritage,” and the community sees it as integral to its way of life. However, warming waters are attracting other species—particularly jellyfish—to shallow parts of the water, crowding out the shrimp and leading to a lower catch rate. Fishermen are concerned about the change in their waters, but are determined to keep the tradition alive. Have you heard of these horseback shrimpers? Let us know in the comments 🦐 🐎 🇧🇪
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Photo courtesy of Koksijde Tourism @koksijde_oostduinkerke

The Belgian custom of shrimping on horseback is at risk due to climate change. In the tradition, which dates back to the 16th century, fishermen ride through shallow waters with nets attached to their saddles. @unesco has designated the custom as an “intangible cultural heritage,” and the community sees it as integral to its way of life. However, warming waters are attracting other species—particularly jellyfish—to shallow parts of the water, crowding out the shrimp and leading to a lower catch rate. Fishermen are concerned about the change in their waters, but are determined to keep the tradition alive. Have you heard of these horseback shrimpers? Let us know in the comments 🦐 🐎 🇧🇪
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Photo courtesy of Koksijde Tourism @koksijde_oostduinkerke

Photo taken at: Koksijde, Belgium

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In Alaska, humans have relied on the caribou and salmon that migrate across their vast plains and oceans for centuries. Those lands, creatures and food sources are now at risk. President Trump is trying to open up Alaska’s oil and gas rich lands to drilling. This even includes the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), the largest national wildlife refuge in the country. The Inupiaq tribe lives in the coastal region of the refuge and now faces that their land may again be in jeopardy. One resident, Charles Lampe, said it’s like “putting chains on our hands and our legs and telling us we don’t care what you think—this is how it’s got to be.” Not only would the extraction of fossil fuels contribute to climate change, but also will surely affect those living in these lush natural landscapes. To see CNN’s interactive report on this, click the link in our bio. Comment below if you think the Inupiaq people should have autonomy over their land.

In Alaska, humans have relied on the caribou and salmon that migrate across their vast plains and oceans for centuries. Those lands, creatures and food sources are now at risk. President Trump is trying to open up Alaska’s oil and gas rich lands to drilling. This even includes the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), the largest national wildlife refuge in the country. The Inupiaq tribe lives in the coastal region of the refuge and now faces that their land may again be in jeopardy. One resident, Charles Lampe, said it’s like “putting chains on our hands and our legs and telling us we don’t care what you think—this is how it’s got to be.” Not only would the extraction of fossil fuels contribute to climate change, but also will surely affect those living in these lush natural landscapes. To see CNN’s interactive report on this, click the link in our bio. Comment below if you think the Inupiaq people should have autonomy over their land.

In Alaska, humans have relied on the caribou and salmon that migrate across their vast plains and oceans for centuries. Those lands, creatures and food sources are now at risk. President Trump is trying to open up Alaska’s oil and gas rich lands to drilling. This even includes the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), the largest national wildlife refuge in the country. The Inupiaq tribe lives in the coastal region of the refuge and now faces that their land may again be in jeopardy. One resident, Charles Lampe, said it’s like “putting chains on our hands and our legs and telling us we don’t care what you think—this is how it’s got to be.” Not only would the extraction of fossil fuels contribute to climate change, but also will surely affect those living in these lush natural landscapes. To see CNN’s interactive report on this, click the link in our bio. Comment below if you think the Inupiaq people should have autonomy over their land.

Photo taken at: Murie Science and Learning Center

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The Gloomy Octopus could bring about dark days for fishermen in parts of Australia and Tasmania. As warm water cephalopods, Gloomies have been heading down the coast of Australia to follow the increasing temperatures of the East Australian Current. This current is extending further south due to climate change’s impacts on ocean temperature. Gloomies have a shellfish-based diet that could deplete the southern shellfish population to whom these predators are foreign. Fisheries in Tasmania are also concerned as 75% of their catch consists of abalone and red rock lobsters, on which Gloomies prey. Want a less gloomy future? Click the link in our bio to learn more.

The Gloomy Octopus could bring about dark days for fishermen in parts of Australia and Tasmania. As warm water cephalopods, Gloomies have been heading down the coast of Australia to follow the increasing temperatures of the East Australian Current. This current is extending further south due to climate change’s impacts on ocean temperature. Gloomies have a shellfish-based diet that could deplete the southern shellfish population to whom these predators are foreign. Fisheries in Tasmania are also concerned as 75% of their catch consists of abalone and red rock lobsters, on which Gloomies prey. Want a less gloomy future? Click the link in our bio to learn more.

The Gloomy Octopus could bring about dark days for fishermen in parts of Australia and Tasmania. As warm water cephalopods, Gloomies have been heading down the coast of Australia to follow the increasing temperatures of the East Australian Current. This current is extending further south due to climate change’s impacts on ocean temperature. Gloomies have a shellfish-based diet that could deplete the southern shellfish population to whom these predators are foreign. Fisheries in Tasmania are also concerned as 75% of their catch consists of abalone and red rock lobsters, on which Gloomies prey. Want a less gloomy future? Click the link in our bio to learn more.

Photo taken at: Tasmania

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A friend of the monarch might soon become a foe. Cardenolides, a chemical in milkweed, are toxic to many predators of monarch butterflies, but monarchs themselves have evolved to tolerate the toxins. Monarchs are able to feed on milkweed and lay their eggs on the plant, giving the larvae more protection against predators. Tropical milkweed in particular has a higher level of cardenolides, which is actually good for these butterflies. Scientists have found monarchs that feed on the tropical variety tend to be heavier and are more likely to survive. However, researchers are also finding that increasing temperatures due to climate change can increase the amount of cardenolides in tropical milkweed. This excess amount may become fatal to feeding monarchs. Higher rates of the chemical could also poison larvae, delay growth, and stunt adults.

A friend of the monarch might soon become a foe. Cardenolides, a chemical in milkweed, are toxic to many predators of monarch butterflies, but monarchs themselves have evolved to tolerate the toxins. Monarchs are able to feed on milkweed and lay their eggs on the plant, giving the larvae more protection against predators. Tropical milkweed in particular has a higher level of cardenolides, which is actually good for these butterflies. Scientists have found monarchs that feed on the tropical variety tend to be heavier and are more likely to survive. However, researchers are also finding that increasing temperatures due to climate change can increase the amount of cardenolides in tropical milkweed. This excess amount may become fatal to feeding monarchs. Higher rates of the chemical could also poison larvae, delay growth, and stunt adults.

A friend of the monarch might soon become a foe. Cardenolides, a chemical in milkweed, are toxic to many predators of monarch butterflies, but monarchs themselves have evolved to tolerate the toxins. Monarchs are able to feed on milkweed and lay their eggs on the plant, giving the larvae more protection against predators. Tropical milkweed in particular has a higher level of cardenolides, which is actually good for these butterflies. Scientists have found monarchs that feed on the tropical variety tend to be heavier and are more likely to survive. However, researchers are also finding that increasing temperatures due to climate change can increase the amount of cardenolides in tropical milkweed. This excess amount may become fatal to feeding monarchs. Higher rates of the chemical could also poison larvae, delay growth, and stunt adults.

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A summer in the Northern Hemisphere is nearing its halfway point, people are already planning their winter getaways. Colorado boasts some of the best ski mountains and resorts in the world. The state is known for long ski seasons with plenty of powdery snow. However, climate change is already devastating Colorado’s slopes. Colorado’s average temperature has increased more than 2 degrees in the last 40 years. As global temperatures continue to rise, ski seasons are diminishing and snowfall is coming up short. Skiers are finding runs to be icy and covered in threadbare blankets of snow with grass and rocks peeking through. As of early January, Colorado’s snowpack was lower than it had been in 30 years. The @epagov estimates that Colorado ski areas will see their already fleeting seasons dwindle by 10-15% by 2050. For a usual 150-day ski season, that means a reduction of between 2 weeks to nearly 3 months. Eventually, the @epagov estimates that some Colorado ski areas will see seasons shortened by as much as 80% from present-day levels by 2090. Breckenridge Ski Resort’s average ski season is 5 months and 1 week. However, an 80% season shortening would leave skiers with only 32 days on the mountain. How do you think this will impact the local economy who rely on ski resorts for jobs? Let us know in the comments.

A summer in the Northern Hemisphere is nearing its halfway point, people are already planning their winter getaways. Colorado boasts some of the best ski mountains and resorts in the world. The state is known for long ski seasons with plenty of powdery snow. However, climate change is already devastating Colorado’s slopes. Colorado’s average temperature has increased more than 2 degrees in the last 40 years. As global temperatures continue to rise, ski seasons are diminishing and snowfall is coming up short. Skiers are finding runs to be icy and covered in threadbare blankets of snow with grass and rocks peeking through. As of early January, Colorado’s snowpack was lower than it had been in 30 years. The @epagov estimates that Colorado ski areas will see their already fleeting seasons dwindle by 10-15% by 2050. For a usual 150-day ski season, that means a reduction of between 2 weeks to nearly 3 months. Eventually, the @epagov estimates that some Colorado ski areas will see seasons shortened by as much as 80% from present-day levels by 2090. Breckenridge Ski Resort’s average ski season is 5 months and 1 week. However, an 80% season shortening would leave skiers with only 32 days on the mountain. How do you think this will impact the local economy who rely on ski resorts for jobs? Let us know in the comments.

A summer in the Northern Hemisphere is nearing its halfway point, people are already planning their winter getaways. Colorado boasts some of the best ski mountains and resorts in the world. The state is known for long ski seasons with plenty of powdery snow. However, climate change is already devastating Colorado’s slopes. Colorado’s average temperature has increased more than 2 degrees in the last 40 years. As global temperatures continue to rise, ski seasons are diminishing and snowfall is coming up short. Skiers are finding runs to be icy and covered in threadbare blankets of snow with grass and rocks peeking through. As of early January, Colorado’s snowpack was lower than it had been in 30 years. The @epagov estimates that Colorado ski areas will see their already fleeting seasons dwindle by 10-15% by 2050. For a usual 150-day ski season, that means a reduction of between 2 weeks to nearly 3 months. Eventually, the @epagov estimates that some Colorado ski areas will see seasons shortened by as much as 80% from present-day levels by 2090. Breckenridge Ski Resort’s average ski season is 5 months and 1 week.  However, an 80% season shortening would leave skiers with only 32 days on the mountain. How do you think this will impact the local economy who rely on ski resorts for jobs? Let us know in the comments.

Photo taken at: Breckenridge Ski Resort

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The British Virgin Islands are known for beautiful weather and pristine beaches, however, climate change is devastating these scenic destinations. Wetlands, mangroves, ponds, coral reefs, beaches, and private properties were all greatly damaged by Hurricane Irma in 2017. This damage leaves beaches, coasts, and communities who are particularly vulnerable at a higher risk. Half of the coral reefs around the British Virgin Islands have disappeared over the last 25 years. These reefs act as natural buffers against powerful waves so when they shrink, the coast floods more easily. Beaches on the island of Tortola have lost about 24 feet in width since 1953 due to the loss of healthy coral reefs. Whether you live on these gorgeous islands year round or you’re just stopping by, be sure your stay creates a positive impact 🏝💚

The British Virgin Islands are known for beautiful weather and pristine beaches, however, climate change is devastating these scenic destinations. Wetlands, mangroves, ponds, coral reefs, beaches, and private properties were all greatly damaged by Hurricane Irma in 2017. This damage leaves beaches, coasts, and communities who are particularly vulnerable at a higher risk. Half of the coral reefs around the British Virgin Islands have disappeared over the last 25 years. These reefs act as natural buffers against powerful waves so when they shrink, the coast floods more easily. Beaches on the island of Tortola have lost about 24 feet in width since 1953 due to the loss of healthy coral reefs. Whether you live on these gorgeous islands year round or you’re just stopping by, be sure your stay creates a positive impact 🏝💚

The British Virgin Islands are known for beautiful weather and pristine beaches, however, climate change is devastating these scenic destinations. Wetlands, mangroves, ponds, coral reefs, beaches, and private properties were all greatly damaged by Hurricane Irma in 2017. This damage leaves beaches, coasts, and communities who are particularly vulnerable at a higher risk. Half of the coral reefs around the British Virgin Islands have disappeared over the last 25 years. These reefs act as natural buffers against powerful waves so when they shrink, the coast floods more easily. Beaches on the island of Tortola have lost about 24 feet in width since 1953 due to the loss of healthy coral reefs. Whether you live on these gorgeous islands year round or you’re just stopping by, be sure your stay creates a positive impact 🏝💚

Photo taken at: British Virgin Islands

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Heavy rain after tropical storm Son Tinh has led to floods and landslides across Vietnam. A country whose coastline spans over 3,000 km, Vietnam is particularly prone to flooding and destructive storms. The storm’s forceful rain triggered landslides and flash floods, killing 27 people. Son Tinh also affected nearly 64,000 hectares of rice and 3,200 hectares of cash crops. More storms and weather incidents like Son Tinh could greatly affect the Vietnamese economy as well as its natural landscape. This destruction is indicative of the future coastal countries will face as they battle natural disasters and climate change related issues.

Heavy rain after tropical storm Son Tinh has led to floods and landslides across Vietnam. A country whose coastline spans over 3,000 km, Vietnam is particularly prone to flooding and destructive storms. The storm’s forceful rain triggered landslides and flash floods, killing 27 people. Son Tinh also affected nearly 64,000 hectares of rice and 3,200 hectares of cash crops. More storms and weather incidents like Son Tinh could greatly affect the Vietnamese economy as well as its natural landscape. This destruction is indicative of the future coastal countries will face as they battle natural disasters and climate change related issues.

Heavy rain after tropical storm Son Tinh has led to floods and landslides across Vietnam. A country whose coastline spans over 3,000 km, Vietnam is particularly prone to flooding and destructive storms. The storm’s forceful rain triggered landslides and flash floods, killing 27 people. Son Tinh also affected nearly 64,000 hectares of rice and 3,200 hectares of cash crops. More storms and weather incidents like Son Tinh could greatly affect the Vietnamese economy as well as its natural landscape. This destruction is indicative of the future coastal countries will face as they battle natural disasters and climate change related issues.

Photo taken at: Halong Bay, Vietnam

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Polar bears are being found in places they have never been seen before. In an article by Ryan Kunz, a researcher @nsfgov, Kunz details an unusual polar bear sighting. He was working in Greenland at the top of the Northern Hemisphere’s largest ice sheet, more than 10,000 feet above ground, when he saw a polar bear. The sighting forced many working at the station to stay indoors for 36 hours as others tried to lure the bear away by launching food far from the station. This sighting could be a record for a polar bear climb, as they generally stay on sea ice and are unlikely to go that high off the ground. Though it’s unclear whether polar bears will make treks like this one more frequently, their habitat is drastically changing which could lead to changes in polar bear behavior. With shrinking ice sheets, polar bear behaviors may become unpredictable as they search for new habitats.

Polar bears are being found in places they have never been seen before. In an article by Ryan Kunz, a researcher @nsfgov, Kunz details an unusual polar bear sighting. He was working in Greenland at the top of the Northern Hemisphere’s largest ice sheet, more than 10,000 feet above ground, when he saw a polar bear. The sighting forced many working at the station to stay indoors for 36 hours as others tried to lure the bear away by launching food far from the station. This sighting could be a record for a polar bear climb, as they generally stay on sea ice and are unlikely to go that high off the ground. Though it’s unclear whether polar bears will make treks like this one more frequently, their habitat is drastically changing which could lead to changes in polar bear behavior. With shrinking ice sheets, polar bear behaviors may become unpredictable as they search for new habitats.

Polar bears are being found in places they have never been seen before. In an article by Ryan Kunz, a researcher @nsfgov, Kunz details an unusual polar bear sighting. He was working in Greenland at the top of the Northern Hemisphere’s largest ice sheet, more than 10,000 feet above ground, when he saw a polar bear. The sighting forced many working at the station to stay indoors for 36 hours as others tried to lure the bear away by launching food far from the station. This sighting could be a record for a polar bear climb, as they generally stay on sea ice and are unlikely to go that high off the ground. Though it’s unclear whether polar bears will make treks like this one more frequently, their habitat is drastically changing which could lead to changes in polar bear behavior. With shrinking ice sheets, polar bear behaviors may become unpredictable as they search for new habitats.

Photo taken at: Summit Camp

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Climate change is putting white furred animals at serious risk. White fur helps animals blend in with the snow during the winter, but warming temperatures are reducing the amount of snowfall around the globe. Polish researchers found that in the Bialowieza Forest in Poland, the natural habitat of the white-coated weasel, the number of days with snow cover were cut in half from 1997 to 2007. And if their surroundings aren’t white, white animals stick out like a sore thumb, making it harder to hide from predators. This is why the author of the study Dr. Karol Zub stated, “it is very probable that in the near future white weasels and stoats will disappear completely from many areas of Northern Europe and North America.” Rising temperatures will likely affect other white-furred mammals like this rabbit, even leaving some species of birds at risk. For more on white morphs, watch our video by clicking the link in our bio.

Climate change is putting white furred animals at serious risk. White fur helps animals blend in with the snow during the winter, but warming temperatures are reducing the amount of snowfall around the globe. Polish researchers found that in the Bialowieza Forest in Poland, the natural habitat of the white-coated weasel, the number of days with snow cover were cut in half from 1997 to 2007. And if their surroundings aren’t white, white animals stick out like a sore thumb, making it harder to hide from predators. This is why the author of the study Dr. Karol Zub stated, “it is very probable that in the near future white weasels and stoats will disappear completely from many areas of Northern Europe and North America.” Rising temperatures will likely affect other white-furred mammals like this rabbit, even leaving some species of birds at risk. For more on white morphs, watch our video by clicking the link in our bio.

Climate change is putting white furred animals at serious risk. White fur helps animals blend in with the snow during the winter, but warming temperatures are reducing the amount of snowfall around the globe. Polish researchers found that in the Bialowieza Forest in Poland, the natural habitat of the white-coated weasel, the number of days with snow cover were cut in half from 1997 to 2007. And if their surroundings aren’t white, white animals stick out like a sore thumb, making it harder to hide from predators. This is why the author of the study Dr. Karol Zub stated, “it is very probable that in the near future white weasels and stoats will disappear completely from many areas of Northern Europe and North America.” Rising temperatures will likely affect other white-furred mammals like this rabbit, even leaving some species of birds at risk. For more on white morphs, watch our video by clicking the link in our bio.

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Lebanon’s historic cedar trees, glorified by the Phoenicians and the Egyptians, are now threatened by climate change. The trees, some as old as 3,000 years, need a certain amount of snow and rainfall for natural regeneration. But with climate change, winters are seeing less precipitation. The Lebanese government estimates that snow cover could fall 40% by 2040. Changing climate can also lead to an increase in insects with the potential to attack, weaken, and ultimately kill the cedars. While reforestation efforts are being undertaken by various organizations, impacts from climate change will continue to affect these historic trees in the years to come.

Lebanon’s historic cedar trees, glorified by the Phoenicians and the Egyptians, are now threatened by climate change. The trees, some as old as 3,000 years, need a certain amount of snow and rainfall for natural regeneration. But with climate change, winters are seeing less precipitation. The Lebanese government estimates that snow cover could fall 40% by 2040. Changing climate can also lead to an increase in insects with the potential to attack, weaken, and ultimately kill the cedars. While reforestation efforts are being undertaken by various organizations, impacts from climate change will continue to affect these historic trees in the years to come.

Lebanon’s historic cedar trees, glorified by the Phoenicians and the Egyptians, are now threatened by climate change. The trees, some as old as 3,000 years, need a certain amount of snow and rainfall for natural regeneration. But with climate change, winters are seeing less precipitation. The Lebanese government estimates that snow cover could fall 40% by 2040. Changing climate can also lead to an increase in insects with the potential to attack, weaken, and ultimately kill the cedars. While reforestation efforts are being undertaken by various organizations, impacts from climate change will continue to affect these historic trees in the years to come.

Photo taken at: Lebanon

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